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Thursday, February 22
 

9:00am

Prepare Poster and Print
  • Must be in vertical format.
  • The maximum size is 4 ft high x 3 ft wide.
  • To avoid overlapping an adjacent poster, the printed section should not exceed 44 inches high and 32 inches wide.
  • Download and use the required template here:
    http://ardenworkspace.com/usf18page.html
    - SERC - use the template that was emailed by Dr. Burns
  • About Printing: Note that USF Health Colleges may have copy centers that might be able to help with printing at reasonable costs. The Marshall Center also has a service that is reasonable. You may also use external copy centers to make your posters such as Pro-Copy, FedEx Office Print, South Tampa Printing, and others.

Thursday February 22, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am
TBA

9:15am

e-Poster How To
Please use the attached e-Poster How To PDF


Thursday February 22, 2018 9:15am - 9:45am
TBA

4:00pm

Early Registration and Poster Set-up
Check in and set up your poster early by coming over on Thursday afternoon from 4:00 - 6:00!

Thursday February 22, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Ballroom Pre-function area & Ballroom
 
Friday, February 23
 

7:30am

Registration and Poster Set-Up Continues
7:30-9:30 Registration and Set up Poster
8:00-12:00 Poster Presentations (be at your poster for judging from 10-12)
8:15-10:00 Featured Lecture
12:00-1:00 Lunch Break
12:00-2:30 Oral Presentations
2:30-3:30 Awards Ceremony
3:30-4:30 Reception
3:30-4:30 Remove your poster

Friday February 23, 2018 7:30am - 9:30am
Ballroom Pre-function area & Ballroom

8:00am

Poster Presentations
Poster Presentations

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

113 Circulating Oxidized Mitochondrial DNA is an Index of Pyroptotic Cell Death in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome
Grace A. Ward B.S., Kathy L. McGraw Ph.D., Ashley A. Basiorka Ph.D., Alan F. List MD

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) are bone marrow failure diseases typified by chronic bone marrow inflammation, ineffective hematopoiesis, and peripheral blood cytopenias. We recently demonstrated that cell death in MDS arises from pyroptosis mediated through the Nod-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome (Basiorka, 2016, Blood). Oxidized mitochondrial DNA (oxDNA) leaks to the cytosol upon mitochondrial membrane depolarization and is consequently released from pyroptotic progenitors upon cytolysis (Shimada, 2012, Immunity. Vollmer, 2004, Immunology). OxDNA serves as a danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) that can amplify cell death by direct engagement and activation of NLRP3, in addition to the DNA-recognition receptors Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 and cGAS–STING (Grishman, Pediatric Research, 2012). Our data demonstrate that oxDNA is profoundly elevated in the peripheral blood of MDS patients compared to healthy donors, and increases directly with somatic gene mutation load and surrogate biomarkers of pyroptosis.

Presenters
GW

Grace Ward, B.S.

Doctoral student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

114 Alpha Synuclein Aggregation and Mediates pathologic activities in Parkinson's Disease
Ning Shen, Chuanhai Cao, Xiaoyang lin, Yuzhu Hong, Haiqiang Yang

Parkinson’s disease(PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder affects over 1% of the United States population over 60 years-old. This disease is characterized by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and disordered aggregation of the α-synuclein protein into Lewy bodies. Under normal physiological conditions, α-synuclein is an abundant neuronal protein in the brain contributes to the maintenance of synaptic function and the mediation of dopamine synthesis. However, a growing of evidence has implicated that the abnormal over-expression of α-synuclein participates directly in the neurodegenerative disorder and the death of nerve cells. Experimental result of siRNA demonstrates that down-regulated expression of α-synuclein can be protective to neuron. Finding Understanding the mechanism of alpha-synuclein aggregation could help to find the possible method to cure PD.

Presenters
NS

Ning Shen, PhD

Doctoral student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

115 Phase IIa Trial for Age-Related Hearing Loss: CLARITY-1 Results and Implications for Future Audiology-Related Pharmaceutical Trials
Victoria Sanchez, AuD, PhD; K. Paul Boyev, MD; Theresa Chisolm, PhD; Robert D. Frisina, PhD; Charles H Large, PhD

Advancements in potential pharmaceutical therapies for audiology-related disorders require audiologists to increase their ability to design and participate in clinical trials. Logistical lessons learned from a recent Phase IIa clinical trial (CLARITY-1; ID#NCT02345031) assessing the efficacy and safety of AUT00063, a novel small molecule that positively modulates voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv3), will be presented. Kv3 channels, which are important for auditory neuron function, decline with age in the auditory brainstem. AUT00063 may improve neural synchrony and temporal processing, and, thus is a promising therapy for age-related hearing loss (ARHL). CLARITY-1, a multi-site, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, examined AUT00063’s efficacy and safety in 78 adults (50-89 years) with ARHL. From baseline to 28 days, both active and placebo groups improved on the primary outcome measure, Quick Speech-in-Noise test, but the between-group difference was not statistically significant (p=0.06). Additionally, there were no significant between-group differences on secondary behavioral or self-report measures. AUT00063, however, was found to be safe and well tolerated. The safety profile was commendable and the trial data were of high quality, with excellent compliance and retention, thus, allowing for a conclusive outcome. Implications for future pharmaceutical studies including design, recruitment, and outcome measures will be discussed.

Presenters
VA

Victoria A. Sanchez, AuD, PhD

Faculty, College of Behavioral & Community Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

116 Is Fulminant Hepatic Failure the Nemesis of Liver Transplantation at TGH? A Two Decade Psycho-Social and Long Term Outcomes Study
Pamela Bulu BS, Angel Alsina MD, Alexia Athienitis PhD, Alexa Alsina, Edson Franco MD,  John Leone MD PhD, Victor Bowers MD, Brenna Evans RN, Jacentha Buggs MD, Mark Rumbak MD, Nyingi Kemmer MD

This study follows post-acute liver failure transplant recipients for 20 years to identify psycho-social factors linked to adherance and survival.

Presenters
PB

Pamela Bulu

Undergraduate Student, College of Business


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

117 Directed Alteration of NS1 from Respiratory Syncytial Virus Diminishes Type-1 Interferon Antagonism
Andrew R. McGill, M.S., Kim C. Tran, Michael N. Teng, Ph.D.

Non-structural protein one (NS1) of RSV is a potent interferon antagonist. Interferon singling is a pivotal moment in the innate antiviral response, and inhibition of this process allows for the virus to proliferate more easily within the host. Diminishing the capacity of NS1 to inhibit this process is an attractive approach for the development of a potentially successful RSV vaccine.

Presenters
AR

Andrew R. McGill, M.S.

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

118 Agioedema Vanishing Into Thin Air
Amber N. Pepper, MD, Dennis K. Ledford, MD, Richard F. Lockey, MD

A case of subcutaneous emphysema masquerading as angioedema.

Presenters
AP

Amber Pepper

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

119 NICU Antibiotic Stewardship: Developing a multidisciplinary team to reduce antimicrobial utilization
D'souza S MD, FAAP, Lamba V MD, FAAP, Bassel CL, Pharm ,Gutierrez M MD, Fugate K, MSNRNC-NIC, CPHQ, Balakrishnan M, MD, CSSBB

Antibiotic use in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is required to help treat and prevent infections in neonates. However, unnecessary antibiotic exposure in the NICU can result in direct harm that has consequences for the patient (i.e., increase rate of necrotizing enterocolitis in very low birth weight infants, changes to their microbiome) and for the unit (i.e., changes in local flora and resistance patterns). We developed a multidisciplinary team to monitor and limit antimicrobial usage in our NICU using quality improvement methodology.

Presenters
SG

Shubika Geraldine Dsouza, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

120 Cardiac transplantation and reaction to heparin
Emma Westermann-Clark, MD, Richard F. Lockey, MD

Allergy to heparin complicates major surgeries. This case describes a successful desensitization to heparin, which allowed cardiac transplant to proceed.

Presenters
EW

Emma Westermann-Clark

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

121 Identifying the Root of the Problem: A Case of Recurrent Sinusitis due to Oroantral Communication
Tara Vinyette Saco, M.D., Richard F. Lockey, Jennifer W. Leiding, M.D.

This is a case of recurrent sinusitis due to an oroantral communication (OAC). OACs can occur secondary to a root canal and result in recurrent sinusitis. The diagnosis of an OAC is based on clinical symptoms even though a panoramic dental radiograph or computer tomography (CT) scan of the sinuses can help diagnose it. An OAC should be suspected in subjects with recurrent sinusitis following a dental procedure or a sinus culture yielding oral flora. Identification of an anatomical cause for recurrent sinusitis will prevent an unnecessary and costly immunodeficiency evaluation.

Presenters
TV

Tara V Saco, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

122 A Case of Anaphylaxis to Methotrexate and Successful Desensitization
Sonia Joychan, MD, Bhumika Patel, MD, Jennifer Mayer, MD, Panida Sriaroon, MD

Methotrexate is used to treat various malignancies and autoimmune conditions. Although rare, hypersensitivity reactions to methotrexate have been reported. We describe a case of anaphylaxis to methotrexate and successful desensitization.

Presenters
SJ

Sonia Joychan, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

123 Incidence of reactivated Herpes Zoster (shingles) in patients with Primary Immune Deficiency
David Lindsay MD, Charlotte Cunningham-Rundles MD, PhD, Ramsay L. Fuleihan MD, Mark Ballow, Jennifer W. Leiding MD

Retrospective study to look at incidence of reactivated VZV in a cohort of patients with primary immunodeficiency.

Presenters
DL

David Lindsay, II, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

124 Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Isolates from Post Mastectomy Surgical Site Infections: Potential Implications for Choice of Empiric Therapy.
Anteneh Addisu, MD, PhD, Natan Kraitman, MD, John Greene, MD, FACP

Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections are increasingly recognized causes of postoperative surgical site infections. NTM pose a significant therapeutic challenge due to their intrinsic resistance to the major classic antituberculous drugs and to several other lines of antibacterial agents. Mycobacterium abscessus and fortuitum are two of the rapidly growing mycobacterium commonly isolated from surgical site infections. We present sensitivity pattern of 19 isolates among breast surgical site infections showing remarkable pattern of sensitivity to the commonly used anti mycobacterial agents

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

125 Mechanistic analysis of the Brt/Trp regulatory system in Bartonella henselae
Udoka Okaro, Nhan Tu, Burt Anderson

We identify and characterize the role of a small RNA involved in regulating a virulence gene responsible for biofilm formation.

Presenters
UO

Udoka Okaro

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine
Second year Ph.D student


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

126 Detection of Interferon Gamma (IFN-g) Antibodies in a Patient Presenting with Recurrent Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) Infection
Fatima Khan, MD MBA; Lacey Bernard, MD; Chakrapol Sriaroon MD; Panida Sriaroon MD; Lindsay Rosen; Joie Davis; Steve Holland, MD, Jolan E. Walter MD PhD

Our 43-year-old Thai female patient had recurrent disseminated MAC secondary to immune dysregulation. She presented with a 1 month history of cough, dyspnea, weight loss, and subsequently was diagnosed with disseminated MAC infection. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations were performed, and antibodies to interferon gamma (IFN-g) were detected. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 therapy, led to clinical response.

Presenters
FK

Fatima Khan, MD, MBA

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

127 A novel lysin-human defense fusion protein to inhibit C. difficile infection
Zhong Peng, Bsc., Chunhui Li, MD., Shaohui Wang, PhD., Xingmin Sun, PhD.

Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea worldwide and it is the most frequently reported care-associated pathogen in the United States. Oral antibiotics remains the first choice for the treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI), but there are few kinds of effective antibiotics currently available. In this study, we report the use of a novel lysin-human defense fusion protein to inhibit CDI. This protein was designed by combining the catalytic domain of a lysin protein derived from a phage that is widely present in most C. difficile human source and the active terminal of human alpha-defense 5, and expressed in E. coli BL21. Pre-test showed the fusion protein can inhibit the growth of multiple types of C. difficile clinical isolates well in vitro, including the widespread-hypervirulent ribotype 027 and 078 strains.

Presenters
ZP

Zhong Peng

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

128 Tight Junction Barrier and Clostridium difficile Infection
Trang Q. Nguyen, Jessica Bullock, Xingmin Sun, PhD

Clostridium difficile infection has been shown to cause a defective intestinal epithelial tight junction barrier.  IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha are hypothesized to be the main players in the development of intestinal inflammation and cause an increase in intestinal tight junction permeability.

Presenters
TQ

Trang Q. Nguyen, MS

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

129 Multivalent Mucosal Vaccines Against Clostridium difficile Infection
Duolong Zhu, doctor, Yuanguo Wang, doctor, Laurent Bouillaut, doctor, Ying Cai, doctor, Chunhui Li, doctor, Shaohui Wang, doctor, Abraham L. Sonenshein, doctor, Xingmin Sun, doctor

The symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI) are attributed largely to two C. difficile toxins, TcdA and TcdB. In addition, C. difficile is an enteric pathogen, and mucosal/oral immunization would be particularly useful to protect the host against CDI considering that the gut is the main site of disease onset and progression. Moreover, vaccines directed only against toxins do not target the cells and spores that transmit the disease. The objective of this project is to develop novel mucosal /parenteral vaccines ( mTcd138) that target both C. difficile toxins and colonization/adhesion factors.

Presenters
DZ

Duolong Zhu

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

130 The Role of K13 in Artemisinin Resistance
Justin Gibbons, Swamy R. Adapa, Suzzane Li, Vishal Saxena, John H. Adams, Rays H.Y. Jiang

Artemisinins are a key component of the combination therapy used to treat malaria. Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly from of malaria is evolving resistance to artemisinins. The decreased effectiveness of artemisinins increases the probability of resistance to the partner drugs as well; risking total treatment failure which would result in thousands more deaths a year. The gene shown to have the largest affect in modulating resistance is K13. Here we present an RNA-seq study on an isogenic mutant with a dysregulated K13 gene that provides evidence that K13 is involved in regulating DNA replication and repair.

Presenters
JG

Justin Gibbons

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

131 Development of Tetrazole based Inhibitors against multiple classes of Carbapenemase
Afroza Akhtar, PhD student, Dr. Orville Pemberton, Dr. Xiujun Zhang, Dr. Yu Chen

Carbapenemases are the most versatile family of beta lactamase. They can hydrolyze all beta lactam antibiotics used in the clinical settings. Developing inhibitors to target beta lactamses is an urgent need to combat antibiotic resistance. In our study, we are using tetrazole based compounds to develop novel non covalent inhibitors.  We are using both Biochemical and X ray crystallographic approach for our research. We hope to design a novel drug candidate that can be used to target multiple classes of carbapenemases.

Presenters
AA

Afroza Akhtar

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

132 Our Door Is Open: A Look at the Inclusive Patient Population of Ybor Youth Clinic
J. Harrison Collins MS, E. Enriquez-Bruce MD, P. Emmanuel MD

The Ybor Youth Clinic (YYC), a non-profit clinic under the umbrella of the USF Foundation, provides affordable medical services to underinsured, disenfranchised and LGBTQ youth ages 13 to 24, in a non-judgmental, inclusive environment. Here, we describe the characteristics of the population we serve and identify gaps in services.

Presenters
JH

James Harrison Collins

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

133 Clinical Features and Treatment Responses of Autoimmune Cytopenias with Primary Immunodeficiency at a Tertiary Pediatric Care Facility
Cristina A Meehan MS, Anna K. Meyer MD PHD, Bhumika Patel MD, Amre Devandre PHD, Panida Sriaroon MD, Jennifer Leiding MD, Jolan Walter MD PHD

In a retrospective cohort study, we examined the clinical and laboratory features of a cohort of patients with autoimmune cytopenias (AICs). We sought to establish a standard of care for this rare and complex disease. The research cohort included 165 patients diagnosed with AIC with two sub-cohorts, patients with AIC only diagnosis (n= 149, 90%) and patients with both AIC and primary immune deficiency (PIDs) diagnoses (n = 16, 10%). Measures studied included demographics, AIC onset relative to PID diagnosis, clinical features of AIC with and without PID, cytopenias in patients with PID, immune phenotyping, and treatments and outcomes of AIC with and without PID.

Presenters
CM

Cristina Meehan, BS

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

134 Novel Role of the Innate Immune DNA Sensor – IFI16 (Interferon Gamma Inducible Protein 16) as a Major Epigenetic Modulator During KSHV Infection and Lytic Reactivation
Arunava Roy, PhD; Anandita Ghosh, M.Sc.; Bala Chandran, PhD

Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, one of the major viruses associated with AIDS related cancers, hijacks multiple cellular proteins and pathways to establish lifelong latency in infected hosts. Studies have shown that IFI16 acts as an antiviral restriction factor against a number of DNA viruses, by inhibiting either viral-DNA replication (HCMV and HPV) or transcription (HSV-1, HCMV and HPV) through epigenetic modifications of the viral epigenome. However, till date, no specific epigenetic function of IFI16 has been identified. Here, we have discovered that IFI16 recruits two histone methyltransferases on the KSHV episome leading to altered Histone H3K9 methylation, thus regulating its lifecycle.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

135 Hypogammaglobulinemia in a patient with Turner Syndrome (TS) and Celiac Disease
Shiven Patel MD, Farnaz Tabatabaian MD

Although there are no associations between Turner Syndrome (TS) and immunodeficiency, there are a few case reports detailing subjects with TS and hypogammaglobulinemia.

Presenters
SS

Shiven S Patel

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

136 A Retrospective Review of Actinomycosis at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center
Cyrus Farazmand, MS; Olga Klinkova, MD, MS; John N. Greene, MD, FACP; Sowmya Nanjappa, MD, MBBS

Actinomyces is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes actinomycosis, an infection that is commonly reported to consist of cervicofacial abscesses but can affect a wide variety of body sites. It can closely mimic malignancy on imaging, especially in its pulmonary form, so we aim to better characterize manifestations of the infection in a cancer center setting.

Presenters
CF

Cyrus Farazmand

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

137 Thick cast sputum production and eosinophilia in an adult presenting with respiratory distress
Warit Jithpratuck MD; Vinny Samuel MD; Panida Sriaroon MD

Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) often poses a diagnostic challenge due to its overlapping presentations with other eosinophilic lung diseases. Patients with CEP typically present with progressive respiratory symptoms over several months. Our patient had a 4-month history of productive cough associated with thick cast sputum production. She had peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE. Chest radiographs revealed extensive infiltrations. Her CEP diagnosis was made after other causes of eosinophilic lung disease were excluded. She responded to oral corticosteroids but relapse occurred when treatment was discontinued. Mepolizumab treatment led to excellent clinical response.

Presenters
WJ

Warit Jithpratuck

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

138 Lymph Node Ratio Does Not Predict Survival after Surgery without Post-Op Radiation Therapy for Stage-2 (N1) Lung Cancer in SEER
Danny T. Nguyen, BA; Stephen J. Malachowski, BS, MS; Roger Gerard, BS; Jacques P. Fontaine, MD; Lary A. Robinson, MD; Robert J. Keenan, MD; Eric M. Toloza, MD, PhD

Using a NIH cancer database on US Medicare patients, we investigated how predictive Lymph Node Ratios (LNRs) are in predicting survival of Stage-2(N1) non-small cell lung cancer after lobectomy without post-operation radiation therapy (PORT).

Presenters
DT

Danny T Nguyen

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

139 The Obesity Paradox: A Systematic Review
Charmi Balsara, B.A., Barbara Hansen, Ph.D.

Obesity increases the risk of heart failure (HF). However, in HF patients, there is a survival advantage in overweight and obese patients compared to normal weight patients, an observation termed the obesity paradox. Evidence for the obesity paradox in HF patients predominantly uses the body mass index to classify obesity, but it cannot accurately distinguish body composition components fat distribution. New studies have explored the use of other, more accurate measures such as dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and waist circumference. This study systematically reviewed the relationship between body composition or fat distribution and mortality in HF patients in primary literature.

Presenters
CB

Charmi Balsara, B.A.

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

140 The Impact of Insurance Status at Diagnosis on Overall Survival in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: a Population-Based Analysis
Ashley M Perry, Andrew M Brunner, Tao Zou, Donna Neuberg and Amir T Fathi

This study aimed to determine whether insurance status at diagnosis influences CML patient outcomes. The SEER database was used to identify adult patients diagnosed with CML between 2007-2012. Among patients aged 15 to 64 years, insurance status was associated with OS: being uninsured or having Medicaid was associated with worse 5-year OS. Both uninsured and Medicaid patients also had an increased hazard of death in comparison with insured patients. For patients who were 65 years or older, insurance had less of an impact on OS, with similar 5-year OS rates for patients with Medicaid and those with other insurance.

Presenters
AM

Ashley Marie Perry

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

141 Dissecting evolutionary trajectories toward acquired resistance in EML4-ALK lung cancers
Robert Vander Velde MSc, Viktoriya Marusyk, Olena Balynska, Daria Miroshnychenko, Kenian Liu, Jan Poleszczuk, Andrew Dhawan, Jacob Scott, Andriy Marusyk

Targeted therapies create an effective strategy for decreasing tumor burden. However resistance eventually arises. Most work on resistance has focused on the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Here we explore the evolutionary mechanisms of resistance to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in EML4-ALK positive lung cancer. Specifically we investigate if resistance evolves abruptly or gradually, in a predictable manner and if resistance develops from pre-treatment resistant clones.

Presenters
RV

Robert Vander Velde

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

142 WITHDRAWN CDX2 protein expression in esophageal biopsies without histological evidence of intestinal metaplasia may predict the presence of undetected Barrett’s esophagus.
James Saller, MD; Sameer Al Diffalha; Kevin Neill; Cecilia Oliveri; Hank Levine; David Boulware and Domenico Coppola, M.D.

This study demonstrates the utility of CDX2 IHC for determining patients with a higher likelihood of harboring intestinal metaplasia undetected by the ABPAS stain at their first biopsy. Our findings show that patients with biopsies that are ABPAS negative and CDX2 positive at their first presentation may later present with frank goblet cell intestinal metaplasia.

Presenters
JJ

James J Saller

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

143 Mechanism of Treatment-induced Drug Resistance in Lung Cancer
Mark Howel, Ryan Green, Elspeth Foran, Rajesh Nair, Stanley Stevens, Jit Banerjee, Shyam Mohapatra, and Subhra Mohapatra

Drug resistance is common in NSCLC patients receiving treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs). To investigate the development of this drug resistance, our lab has developed EGFR TKI resistant human lung cancer cell lines. Preliminary data has revealed that upregulation of 2 proteins that may be causing enhanced EGFR downstream signaling, possibly outcompeting the effects of the inhibitor and leading to resistance.

Presenters
MC

Mark C Howell

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

144 Ligand-independent EphA2 signaling drives an amoeboid phenotype that promotes melanoma brain metastasis development
Chao Zhang MS, Inna Smalley, Ritin Sharma, Michael F. Emmons, Jane Messina, John M. Koomen, Keiran S. M. Smalley

The majority of melanoma patients treated with inhibitors of BRAF (BRAFi) ultimately develop resistance and fail on therapy. Acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance is often associated with the adoption of a poorly defined, aggressive, and invasive phenotype that can be driven through ligand-independent EphA2 signaling. The main objective of my PhD is focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying brain metastasis formation in melanoma.

Presenters
CZ

Chao Zhang

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

145 Preclinical Evaluation of EZH2 Inhibition in Combination with Bcl-2 Inhibition in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma
Herman van Besien, BA, Destini Gibbs, BSc, Ari Melnick, MD, Ethel Cesarman, MD-PhD, Lisa G. Roth, MD

The EZH2 histone methyltransferase is a lineage factor for germinal center B cells, and EZH2 inhibitors are toxic to the germinal center B-cell (GCB) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (GCB-DLBCL). The EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438 is undergoing phase I and II trials in GCB-DLBCL with early reports of clinical activity. Since EZH2 inhibition is unlikely to be curative by itself, we performed a drug screening that identified potential synergy between EZH2 and Bcl2 inhibition. We used the selective Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199 to perform in-vitro combination experiments with EPZ-6438.

Presenters
HJ

Herman J van Besien

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

146 Dynamic Changes in Transposon Expression and Epigenetic Regulators Detected During Early Breast Cancer Transition to Malignancy
Isaac Raplee MS, Alexei Evsikov Phd, Caralina Marin de Evsikova PhD

Here we used a novel bioinformatics pipeline of publically available RNA sequencing data to elucidate prognostic factors associated with breast cancer progression. Our data supports genomic changes underly malignancy transformation.

Presenters
IR

Isaac Raplee

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

147 NPRA signaling in the tumor/stroma microenvironment influences the growth of stem-like cancer cells
Ryan Green MS, Mark Howell MS, Rajesh Nair PhD, Shruti Padhee PhD, Scott Antonia PhD, Eva Samal PhD, Jit Banerjee, Shyam Mohapatra PhD, and Subhra Mohapatra PhD

Alterations to NPRA signaling may lead to inhibition of cancer stem cell (CSC) proliferation; we report the development of a 3D tumor/stroma co-culture model to study and further define the role that NPRA plays in CSC development and drug resistance.

Presenters
RG

Ryan Green

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

148 Citrullinated Histone 3 Contributes to Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction During Sepsis
Jamie E. Meegan, Xiaoyuan (Sherry) Yang, Melanie Jannaway, Victor Chatterjee, Sarah Y. Yuan

Circulating extracellular histones are known to contribute to tissue injury in systemic inflammatory responses to infection, trauma, and burns. Citrullination of histone 3, catalyzed by the peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) enzyme, is thought to initiate the process of NETosis (the release of neutrophil extracellular traps) in response to infection. NETs are composed of a chromatin web with attached proteases and histones, including citrullinated histone 3 (citH3). This study aimed to identify the effects of citH3 on endothelial barrier dysfunction during inflammation.

Presenters
JE

Jamie E. Meegan, BS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

149 A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 15-Mediated Glycocalyx Disruption Contributes to Vascular Leakage During Septic Injury
Xiaoyuan (Sherry) Yang, PhD, Jamie E. Meegan, BS, Melanie Jannaway, PhD, Danielle C. Coleman, MS, Sarah Y. Yuan, MD, PhD

Disruption of vascular endothelial barrier contributes to multiple organ failure in patients with sepsis. Glycocalyx, a vascular barrier protective matrix covering the apical surface of endothelial cells, has been shown to undergo enzymatic degradation during inflammation. The present study identified a novel role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 15 (ADAM15) in inflammation-induced glycocalyx degradation via its ability to cleave glycocalyx component CD44, and demonstrated that ADAM15-mediated glycocalyx shedding contributed to vascular hyperpermeability in sepsis.

Presenters
XS

Xiaoyuan (Sherry) Yang

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

150 Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Production by the Sigma Receptor Agonist Afobazole
Zeinab Y. Motawe, Christopher P. Katnik, Andrea N. Trujillo, Javier Cuevas, Jerome W. Breslin.

Afobazole is a sigma-1 receptor agonist that has been shown to enhance survival in a rat mid-cerebral artery occlusion stroke model. The mechanism has been previously attributed to an inhibition of ischemia-induced calcium dysregulation that lowers glial cell loss and infarct volume.This study shows for the first time a novel mechanism by which afobazole can relax brain arterioles via eNOS-mediated NO production. This mechanism is likely associated with previously reported improvements of outcomes following stroke induced brain injury.

Presenters
ZY

Zeinab Y. Motawe, MD

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

151 Renal Mechanisms for Hypertension in Diabetes
Jie Zhang Ph.D., Lei Wang Ph.D., Jin Wei Ph.D., Ruisheng Liu M.D. Ph.D.

We study the role of macula densa nitric oxide generation in the development of hypertension in diabetes.

Presenters
JZ

Jie Zhang

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

152 Longitudinal Evaluation of the Associations between Severe Hypertriglyceridemia and Cardiovascular Features in Rhesus Monkeys
Samuel C. Gidanian, Uddhav K. Chaudhari, Jennifer D. Newcomb, Rahul Mhaskar, Barbara C. Hansen

The existence of an independent association between hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular disease remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to characterize the associations between systolic blood pressure and various cardiovascular features under different degrees of naturally-occurring hypertriglyceridemia severity and to determine the independent effect of severe hypertriglyceridemia.

Presenters
SC

Samuel C. Gidanian

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

153 Cardiovascular Risk Communication in Diabetic English, Spanish, and Vietnamese Speaking Patients and Physicians
Christine Le, BS, Shaista Malik, M.D., PhD, MPH, Ashwini Erande, MPH, Joseph Tran, BS, Anthony Tran, BS, Alessandra Miranda M.D., Chris Nguyen, BS

During our study, we evaluated audiotapes of medical visits between three different ethnic/racial group of diabetic patients (Non-Hispanic, Hispanic and Vietnamese) and their physicians in order to measure the frequency of cardiovascular risk communication by the physicians during a routine visit and to examine the effect of this communication on the health of these diabetic patients.

Presenters
CL

Christine Le

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

154 Increased Rates and Risk of Atrial Arrhythmias in Patients with B-Cell Malignancies Treated with Ibrutinib Compared to Traditional Chemotherapy
Matthew Gliksman, Matthew Schabath PhD, Josephine Emole MD, Frederico Viganego MD, Bijal Shah MD, Julio Chavez MD, Christine Walko PharmD, Howard Mcleod PharmD, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz MD PhD, Michael Fradley MD

Evidence suggests that Ibrutinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is correlated with increased rates of atrial arrhythmias in those using it to treat B-cell malignancies. There is limited data regarding these rates in clinical practice. Our retrospective case control study compares patients at Moffitt Cancer Center diagnosed with B-cell malignancies who received Ibrutinib to those who received standard chemotherapy, with a focus on atrial arrhythmias and various risk factors.

Presenters
MG

Matthew Gliksman

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

155 Relaxin Receptor, Tubuloglomerular Feedback and Preeclampsia
Jin Wei, Jie Zhang, Lei Wang, Ruisheng Liu

We propose to study the mechanism and significance of tubuloglomerular feedback in the development of hypertension in preeclampsia.

Presenters
JW

Jin Wei

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

156 Lymphatic Wall Remodeling with Systemic and Tissue-Associated Inflammation in Obese Zucker Rats
Andrea N. Trujillo PhD, Jerome W. Breslin PhD

The proposed research includes study of a single rodent model (Obese Zucker Rat) over time, providing details of the relationship between the accumulation of fat and lymphatic structure and function, along with the extent to which inflammation contributes to lymphatic dysfunction.

Presenters
AN

Andrea N Trujillo, PhD

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

157 A Mouse Model of Dual Kidney Transplantation
Lei Wang, Ph.D.; Jin Wei, Ph.D.; Jie Zhang, Ph.D.; Ruisheng Liu, MD, Ph.D

We have successfully generated a mouse model of dual kidney transplantation (DKT). The hemodynamic responses following DKT are more mimic physiological situations with less kidney injury and better recovery after surgery than traditional single kidney transplantation.

Presenters
LW

Lei Wang

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

158 Effects of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate on Endothelial Barrier Function Following Hypoxic Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock.
Natascha Alves, B.A., Sarah Yuan, M.D., PhD., Jerome Breslin, PhD

This study investigates how the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) protects against endothelial barrier dysfunction caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HSR). It assesses to what extent S1P can reduce intrinsic apoptosis activation and shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx layer following HSR.

Presenters
NG

Natascha G Alves, BA

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

159 LIN28B/let-7 Axis Correlates with Infantile Hemangioma Stages and Response to Propranolol
Ezinne Francess Mong, Kemal Marc Akat, John Canfield, John Lockhart , Jeffrey VanWye, Andrew Matar, John Tsibris, June Wu, Thomas Tuschl, Hana Totary-Jain

This work uncovers the role of the LIN28B/let-7 switch in IH pathogenesis and provides a novel mechanism by which propranolol induces IH involution. Furthermore, it provides therapeutic implications for cancers in which the LIN28/let-7 pathway is imbalanced.

Presenters
EF

Ezinne F. Mong, MS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

161 T-helper Cell Phenotype Expression in Cutaneous Lesions of Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma
Nupur U. Patel, MS; John Denigris, MD; Tania Mendoza, MD; Lubomir Sokol, MD, PhD; and Lucia Seminario-Vidal, MD, PhD

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a common type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. AITL can be missed until lymphadenopathy develops in patients initially presenting with skin lesions, as skin biopsy may lack conclusive findings. The expression of follicular helper T-cell (THF) markers in the skin can be an important diagnostic clue. We present a case of AITL with skin lesions positive for CD10 and dim PD1 T-cells, with the purpose of highlighting the potential for diagnosing cutaneous AITL via skin biopsy.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

162 Elephantiasic Pretibial Myxedema, Chronic and Recalcitrant Thyroid Dermopathy
Alisha Agrawal, BA, Anna Kim, MD, Erfon Ekhlassi, MD, Lucia Seminario-Vidal, MD, PhD

Patients afflicted with autoimmune thyroiditis, specifically Graves’ disease, can have extrathyroidal manifestations such as exophthalmos, thyroid dermopathy, and acropachy. Thyroid dermopathy usually presents as pretibial myxedema (PTM) due to its predilection for the pretibial area. PTM can also appear in the setting of hypothyroidism following therapy of Graves' disease. In severe forms of PTM, it can present as the elephantiasic form, which is notoriously resistant to conventional treatment. Due to the disease rarity, only a few case reports of elephantiasic PTM exist in the literature. Here we present a patient who was diagnosed with elephantiasic PTM based on the chronicity of the patient’s dermopathy and dramatic clinical presentation.

Presenters
AA

Alisha Agrawal, BA

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

163 Methadone as an Alternative Treatment in Fibromyalgia Pain, a case report
Jose Rodriguez, Charles Brock, Emil Gaitour, MD

This case highlights the successful use of methadone in a female patient with Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) who after trying different pharmacological therapies, including the ones recommended by established guidelines, did not reach adequate pain relief. Methadone not only provided a better pain control, but also a significantly better adherence compared to a more traditional approach. The use of methadone to treat FMS pain remains controversial since opioids are not the preferred drugs of choice by established guidelines to treat pain, and in light of a national opioid abuse epidemic.

Presenters
JR

Jose Rodriguez, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

164 Prurigo Pigmentosa In Caucasian Female
Chelsea Kesty, B.Sc, Katarina Kesty, M.D. M.B.A, Joseph L. Jorrizzo, M.D.

We present a 36-year-old Caucasian female with a one year history of rash on her chest.  Prurigo pigmentosa was diagnosed clinically and treated with doxycylcine. Fewer than 50 cases have been described in non-Japanese patients. In these cases it is often associated with systemic conditions, which will be discussed whether clinicians should work up where hereditary or genetic factors may not predominate.

Presenters
CK

Chelsea Kesty

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

165 Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Pica: A Case Study
Kristin Edwards, M.S., Kayla LaRosa, M.S., Kathleen Armstrong, Ph.D.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an empirically supported treatment for children between the ages of 2 to 7 years with emotional and behavioral disorders. This study investigates the implementation of PCIT with a three-year-old boy diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Pica Eating Disorder, and Argininosuccinate Lyase Deficiency.

Presenters
KE

Kristin Edwards

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

166 Response of a Recurrent Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of the Distal Fibula to Denosumab Therapy
Jose A Jesurajan, BS; Jamie Caracciolo, MD, MBA; Evita B Henderson-Jackson MD; Marilyn M Bui MD, PhD; Odion Binitie MD

Case series of a recurrent aneurysmal bone cyst of the distal fibula treated with denosumab and curetting.

Presenters
JJ

Jose Jesurajan

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

167 WITHDRAWN Left Anterior Cruciate Ligament tear in a Female Collegiate Softball Player
Dylan Dewey BS, Allison Palmer BS, Amanda Tritsch PhD

This case report highlights a female collegiate softball player who suffered an anterior cruciate ligament tear with a nontraditional mechanism. In addition to the unique mechanism of injury, her reconstruction utilized a relatively new surgical technique (quadriceps tendon autograft), and her rehabilitation plan included a novel approach using bloodflow restriction therapy. Initial feedback indicates that these approaches were successful. Future cases to assess long term outcomes would be beneficial.

Presenters
DD

Dylan Dewey, BS., MS.

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

168 Intersitial Mycosis Fungoides: A Rare Histopathological Variant of the Most Common Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
Castner, N, BS, Weinkle, A, MD, Seminario-Vidal, L, MD, PhD.

Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Clinically, mycosis fungoides presents with a rash, pruritus, and at late stages, tumors. Disease is typically limited to the skin, but is known to occasionally involve visceral organs and the blood. Diagnosing MF can often be challenging because of its ability to mimic other benign dermatologic conditions both clinically and histopathologically. Further complicating this process is the fact that there are multiple histopathological subtypes of MF, including interstitial mycosis fungoides (IMF), a subtype that is scarcely reported in the available literature. Herein, a case of IMF is reported.

Presenters
NB

Nicholas B. Castner, BS

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

169 A Case of Edematous, Annular Plaques: Clues to the Diagnosis of Urticaria Multiforme
Stephen J. Malachowski, MS, Lauren Metterle, Hyunji Choi, MD, Michael Saco, MD, Lucia Seminario-Vidal, MD, PhD, FAAD

Urticaria multiforme is a clinical variant of acute urticaria. It presents as annular/polycyclic plaques with central duskiness, accompanied by fever and acral edema. It commonly presents between 4 months and 4 years of age and its suggested triggers include drugs (i.e. amoxicillin) and infections, especially Streptococcal pharyngitis, otitis media and viral upper respiratory infections. It is frequently misdiagnosed as erythema multiforme or serum sickness-like reaction.  Distinguishing urticaria multiforme from similar eruptions is important to minimize unnecessary workup and intervention.

Presenters
SJ

Stephen J. Malachowski, MS

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

170 Expanded Latissimus Dorsi Myocutaneous Flap for Burn Scar Reconstruction
Lillian Tung, Amra Kuc, Angie Zhang, Kathryn S. King MD, Deniz Dayicioglu MD

A 41-year-old female with an adolescent history of flame burns to her neck, chest, abdomen, and upper and lower extremities bilaterally presented to clinic for reconstruction following bilateral mastectomy for breast cancer. She subsequently underwent excision of contractures on her neck and left upper extremity with reconstruction using pre-expanded latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps.

Presenters
LT

Lillian Tung

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

171 Acanthosis nigricans at the site of insulin injection
Tyler Jones, MD, Diana Braswell, MD and Leslie Turner, MD

Acanthosis nigricans commonly presents as hyperpigmented plaques involving the axillae or nape of the neck in patients with diabetes mellitus. Here, we present a case of acanthosis nigricans at the insulin injection site of a 69 year-old gentleman with diabetes mellitus.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

172 Utilizing the Retrograde Descending Internal Mammary Vein in DIEP Flap Anastomosis
Amra Kuc, BS; Angie Zhang, BA; Wilton Triggs, MD; Deniz Dayicioglu, MD

A 33-year old woman underwent a right mastectomy with bilateral deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction. Intraoperative discovery of a dislocated catheter prevented us from using the internal mammary vein (IMV) for anastomosis. Spontaneous venous port migration is rare, occurring in about 1- 4%, but is a serious complication of long-term venous cannulation and is often asymptomatic. With the aid of the venous congestion algorithm we elected to anastomose the SIEV to the retrograde descending branch of the IMV stump. In normal cases, the anastomoses would occur using SIEV to anterograde IMV.

Presenters
AK

Amra Kuc

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

173 Clinical and Pathological Characterization of Immunophenotypic Variants of Mycosis Fungoides: A Single Institutional Experience
Tania I. Mendoza, MD, Xiaohui Zhang, MD, Ling Zhang, MD, Lubomir Sokol, MD

Clinico-pathologic correlation of unusual variants of mycosis fungoides.

Presenters
TI

Tania I Mendoza, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

174 Case Review of Pulmonary Talcosis
Min J Kong, Paul Farnsworth, Todd Hazelton, Summer Decker

Case review of a unique case of talc granulomatosis in an intravenous drug user

Presenters
MJ

Min J. Kong

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

175 Acute Aortic Thromboembolism after Right Middle and Lower Bilobectomy for Metastatic High-Grade Sarcoma
Adil Malik, Andrew A. Serdiuk, David Thrush, Evan S. Glazer, Puya Alikhani, Arnold B. Etame, Carla C. Moodie, Joseph R. Garrett, Cheryl Goodman, Robert Koss, Livingstone S. Dore, Michael L. Steighner, Eric M. Huss, Philip J. Werner, Keming Yu, Mihaela Druta, and Eric M. Toloza

This is a presentation of a case of acute aortic thromboembolism following right middle and lower bilobectomy for metastatic high-grade sarcoma from the anterior thigh. It discusses significance of arterial thromboembolic events in cancer patients and challenges faced by physicians. Post-operative care is extremely important, and this report highlights one of many complications that are encountered in this patient population. Epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and goals for prevention are discussed in this report.

Presenters
AM

Adil Malik

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

176 When Safety Glasses Are Forgotten: Diagnosis, Stabalization and Treatment of Open Globe Ocular Injuries
Maximilian R. Padilla MD, Hershel R Patel MS MD, Shayla Bechtle

Approximately 3% of all Emergency Department (ED) visits in the United States are eye trauma related. Up to one third of these result in blindness. In many of these cases blindness can be avoided by correct diagnosis, stabalization of the eye and prompt treatment. In this case study a patient presented to the ED with a fishook in the eye as a result of a fishing accident. This presentation foccuses on the steps that were taken by the ED and Ophthalmology personel to correctly identify, stabalize, and treat this injury. At the end of this incident the patient had visual acuity only slightly worse than before the accident. Our goal is to present epidemiological data on ocular trauma and provide information to those who may encounter ocular trauma in the beginning stages that will help the healthcare team provide rapid treatment for the best visual outcome.

Presenters
MR

Maximilian R. Padilla, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

177 Primary Effusion Lymphoma In The Small Bowel: Identification Of Recurrence Following Novel Treatment With Stem Cell Transplant 
Sarah Mushtaq MD, Sayeef Mirza MD, MPH, Adharsh Ravindran MD, Rawan Faramand MD, Lubomir Sokol MD, PhD

Pleural effusion lymphoma is a malignancy related to HIV/AIDS, which can present with or without malignant pleural effusions. Treatment is chemotherapy and rarely stem cell transplant.

Presenters
SM

Sarah Mushtaq, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

178 Percutaneous Sclerotherapy of Low Flow Venous Malformations Treated with Sodium Tetradecyl Sulphate
Chris DeClue MD, Glenn Hoots MD, Kamal Massis MD

Venous malformations are low flow vascular anomalies. Doppler ultrasound and MRI may be helpful to determine the size and extent of these lesions. The primary indication for treatment is pain. While several treatment options exist, percutaneous sclerotherapy performed by Interventional Radiologists with agents such as sodium tetradecyl sulphate has been growing in acceptance. Given the success of this minimally invasive therapy, interventional management has replaced many surgical indications at specialized centers. We present a case involving a woman with a low flow venous malformation in the right ankle who was treated with sclerotherapy at Tampa General Hospital.

Presenters
CD

Chris DeClue, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

179 Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Small Cell Histology: A Rare Mimic of Metastatic Tumors Involving the Liver
Garrett Fitzpatrick BS, Tania Mendoza MD, Kun Jiang MD, PhD

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer, and the sixth most common human cancer overall. The incidence of HCC is increasing as the prevalence of chronic liver disease increases. Among the major histologic variants of HCC are clear cell, lymphoepithelial, steatohepatic, scirrhous, and fibrolamellar. However, HCC with small cell histology (HCCSC) is extremely rare and remains a challenging diagnosis that can mimic other entities including neuroendocrine tumors, poorly differentiated carcinoma, and others. These cases highlight the importance of astute evaluation of H&E sections and dedicated ancillary investigation in reaching a timely and correct diagnosis of HCCSC.

Presenters
GM

Garrett M. Fitzpatrick

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

180 Acremonium (cephalosporium) species Fungal Keratitis: A Case Report
Hershel R. Patel M.S. M.D., Norberto Mancera M.D., Maximilian Padilla M.D., Ankit Shah M.D.

This is a case  of Acremonium (cephalosporium) species Fungal Keratitis.  An infection of the cornea by a rare pathogen.

Presenters
HR

Hershel R Patel, MS, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

181 Ipilimumab-induced erythema multiforme
Erfon Ekhlassi, Lawangeen Zeb, Doug Laurain, Lucia Seminario-Vidal, MD PhD

Ipilimumab is a monoclonal antibody that acts as a checkpoint inhibitory (CPI) therapy targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). It has been FDA approved for the treatment of stage 3 and late-stage melanoma that is diffuse and unable to be surgically corrected. Immune related adverse events (irAEs) are common adverse events of CPI therapies such as ipilimumab. We report a case of a patient that was initiated on ipilimumab and who subsequently developed an erythema multiforme(EM)-like eruption.

Presenters
EE

Erfon Ekhlassi, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

182 A case of Basal Cell Carcinoma arising within an Infundibular Cyst
Christina M. Ombres, MD, Kathryn A. Cline, Brooke T. Baldwin, MD, and Stefanie Grewe, MD

A basal cell carcinoma and infundibular cyst in association is a rare phenomenon that is not commonly reported in the literature. Here, we report a case with corresponding clinical and histologic images of a 77-year-old American man with a 10-year history of a cystic lesion in his nasolabial fold that presented to the clinic with new onset pain and drainage.

Presenters
CO

Christina Ombres

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

183 Two cases of CMV retinitis presenting as occlusive vasculitis
Norberto Mancera, M.D.; Hershel R. Patel, M.D.; Gina Shetty, M.D.; Swetangi D. Bhaleeya, M.D.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is a serious infection in HIV positive individuals. This condition is rare to diagnose in immunocompetent patients. We present two patients, one who developed CMV retinitis without a diagnosis of HIV and another who developed CMV retinitis in the setting of HIV. Interestingly, both patients had an atypical presentation of occlusive vasculopathy resembling a central retinal artery occlusion.

Presenters
NM

Norberto Mancera, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

184 The Effect of Mitomycin C on Tube Shunt Revisions
Kris-Ann Humphrey, M.D., Alex Zabaneh, M.D., David Richards, M.D., Lisa Gamell, M.D.

Tube shunt failure is a significant complication of glaucoma drainage device placement surgery. Traditionally tube revisions include excision of a capsule overlying the tube shunt plate. In this case series, we show a significant IOP reduction maintained up to 1 year, with subconjunctival injection of mitomycin C in addition to capsule excision.

Presenters
KS

Kris-Ann S. Humphrey, M.D.

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

185 Use of Axillary Lymph Node Dissection (ALND) in Patients with Micrometastatic Breast Cancer
Madison Collins, BA, Cristina O'Donoghue, MD, MPH, Weihong Sun, MD, Jun-min Zhou, MS, Zhenjun Ma, PhD, Christine Laronga, MD, Marie Catherine Lee, MD

Retrospective study on the use of axillary lymph node dissection in the management of patients with micrometastatic breast cancer as compared with sentinel lymph node dissection

Presenters
MC

Madison Collins

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

186 Prevalence of Skin Cancer in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury
Stefanie Grewe, MD, Tommy Yu, MD

This is a retrospective chart review of patients with spinal cord injury or disease who presented to the SCI center of JAHVAH for annual examination between May 2013-May 2015. Here we investigated the prevalence of skin cancer among veterans with spinal cord injury who presented to Spinal Cord Injury Center in Florida to determine if there was an increase. Secondarily, we evaluated the prevalence of each subtype of skin cancer in veterans with spinal cord injury and the relationship of the skin cancer to the duration, level, and severity of the SCI/D.

Presenters
SG

Stefanie Grewe

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

187 Pre-Referral Biopsies of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Do Not Delay Time to Treatment at a Cancer Center
Zachary K Christopher BS, Tyag K Patel BS, Jamie Caracciolo MD, Odion Binitie MD, G Douglas Letson MD, David M Joyce MD

A retrospective chart review of patients referred to a cancer center demonstrated that the location of pre-referral biopsies did not delay time to treatment. Rather, it is more likely that the adequacy of the pre-referral MRI impacted time to treatment.

Presenters
ZC

Zachary Christopher

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

188 Assessing and Improving Health Outcomes of Uninsured Patients with Malignant Melanoma: A Free-Clinic Case Series
Noura Ayoubi, BS, Mohammad Ayoubi, Sudarshan Krishnamurthy, Abu-Sayeef Mirza, MD

Chart reviews of 4,597 patients managed at free-clinics in 2016 were carried out. Uninsured patients with a history of malignant melanoma were further reviewed to assess care and health outcomes. While patients received recommended full-body skin checks at free-clinics, they were unable to follow through with provider-prescribed referrals for biopsies and excisional treatments due to financial restraints. To improve health outcomes, it is imperative for free-clinics to be educated on dermatologic recommendations for preventing disease recurrence. It is also important for them to be aware of local dermatologists who provide subsidized services so that necessary referrals can be followed through.

Presenters
NA

Noura Ayoubi, BS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

189 An Interprofessional Team Approach to Identifying Co-morbities in Teens Eligible for Bariatric Surgery
Brittany Cozart MS3, Meari Taguchi MS4, Sadaf Aslam MBBS, MS, Michel Murr MD, John Paul Gonzalvo DO, and Amy Weiss MD, MPH

Due to an increase in severe childhood obesity and nonsurgical treatments not yielding significant weight-loss or resolving comorbidities, adolescents are now being considered for bariatric surgeries to aid in weight-loss.The TGH+USF Bariatric Center uses a multi-disciplinary team to help these patients achieve their weight-loss goals in the pursuit of wellness. With the data gathered in this center, the team can appreciate and identify prevalent comorbidities in this population.

Presenters
BM

Brittany M. Cozart, BS

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

190 Improving Patient Post-Biopsy Management Standards with Practitioner Guideline Compliance at the James A. Haley VA Dermatology Clinic
Kathryn Cline; Brooke Baldwin, MD, FAAD

500 patient chart review conducted at the James A. Haley VA Dermatology Clinic with a focus on quality improvement of Melanoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Actinic Keratosis biopsy to excision timelines as well as practitioner to patient communication. Practitioner compliance with regard to current clinic guidelines for patient post-biopsy notification was evaluated and analyzed to determine the effect on patient care.

Presenters
KC

Kathryn Cline

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

191 Assessing and Managing High Risk Behaviors Among the Uninsured
Desiree Babin, MS, Sayeef Mirza, MD, MPH

High risk behaviors threaten the mortality of a population. Uninsured patients have access to less resources, receive less care, and are not a part of the health care system due to financial constraints. Free clinics are underresourced and may not offer preventative education. This project is a retrospective chart review that assessed the prevalence of high risk behaviors seen at free clinics in the Tampa Bay community. Socioeconomic variables were compared with rates of HIV care, STI treatment, HIV/STI testing, obesity, smoking and alcohol use among uninsured patients. More awareness and education on high risk behaviors may prevent future disease.

Presenters
DB

Desiree Babin

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

192 Clinical Outcomes of Chondroblastic Osteosarcoma
Katherine Peters, Ambuj Kumar, MD MPH, Odion Binitie, MD

This retrospective cohort study reviewed all patients who presented to Moffitt Cancer Center between 2001 and 2016 with chrondroblastic osteosarcoma. After exclusion of tumors of the skull, 24 patients were included in analysis.

Presenters
KP

Katherine Peters

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

193 Indications and Safety of The Zygomatic Osteotomy in Middle Cranial Fossa Surgery: A Retrospective Cohort Review
Adam Turner, BS, Elliot Neal, MS/BSE,Elliot Pressman, BS BA, Alexia Athienitis, PhD, Gautam Rao, BS, Christopher Primiani, BS, Pankaj Agarwalla, MD, Shunchang Ma, MD, Harry van Loveren, MD, Siviero Agazzi, MD

Zygomatic osteotomy, an adjunct to middle cranial fossa (MCF) surgical approaches, improves the superior-inferior angle of approach and minimizes temporal lobe retraction. However, the impact of the zygomatic osteotomy on approach related complications has not been well documented. We analyzed the factors predicting use of a zygomatic osteotomy for middle fossa approaches and evaluated complications associated with a zygomatic osteotomy.

Presenters
AT

Adam Turner

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

194 Comparison of Intramedullary Screw and Plate-Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Metacarpal Fractures
Carson Smith, BA; Jesse Lewis, MD; Thomas Sellers, MD; Brandon Santoni, PhD; Jason Nydick, DO

This study compared radiographic and clinical outcomes between patients who underwent operative treatment with plate-screw vs. intramedullary headless screw fixation for simple fractures of the neck and shaft of metacarpals II-V. We found that fixation with intramedullary headless screw leads to similar radiographic and clinical outcomes as plate-screw fixation. Intramedullary headless screw fixation may offer a less invasive treatment option with a lower rate of complications and hardware removal.

Presenters
CJ

Carson J Smith, BA

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

195 Utilizing Serum Albumin as a Prognostic Factor in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients
Kyle Sheets, BSE, Mohamed A. Kharfan-Dabaja, MD, Ambuj Kumar, MD MPH, Hemant S. Murthy, MD, Joseph Pidala, MD PhD

This presentation combines two similar studies that look at the prognostic value of serum albumin in patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants for various hematologic malignancies. The studies look to prove that a lower serum albumin level at critical time points is an independent predictor of worse outcomes in the context of overall survival, non-relapse mortality, and graft-versus-host disease.

Presenters
KS

Kyle Sheets

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

196 Cross Sectional Descriptive Study of Pediatric Asthma Care in One Hospital Network
Sarah Bauch, BA; Kimberly Brown, MD; Samantha Goodrich, PhD; Nathan Hagstrom, MD

Uncontrolled asthma has been associated with adverse health and economic outcomes, which include impaired quality of life and higher healthcare expenditures due to unscheduled hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The root causes of poor asthma control in children are not well known. This cross sectional descriptive study of asthma care in a pediatric sample in one hospital network will help identify factors associated with poor control of asthma.

Presenters
SE

Sarah E. Bauch, BA

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

197 Predictors of Completion Node Dissection Positivity in Melanoma: A Retrospective Study
Shan He MS, Justin Martin MS, Matt Perez MD, ZhiHua Chen MS, Jane Messina MD

While sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is the standard of care for patients with melanoma >1 mm in depth, the optimal treatment strategy for patients with tumor-involved SLN is unclear. Completion dissection (CLND) of the involved nodal basin(s) is typically employed, but a recent multicenter international trial (MSLT-2) failed to show improvement in overall survival for patients undergoing CLND. This may be explained partially by the low incidence of positive CLND. We utilize our institutional melanoma database to investigate the relationship of clinicopathologic features of primary melanoma and sentinel node metastases to the presence of metastases in the CLND.

Presenters
SH

Shan He

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

198 Sarcoma Unplanned Excisions: Why Do They Keep Occurring?
Ana Cecilia Belzarena MD, Nicholas Zamith Med student, Nora Watson PA, Odion Binitie MD, John E. Mullinax MD, Ricardo J. Gonzalez MD, Douglas Letson MD, David M Joyce, MD

As part of the Sarcoma Service at Moffitt Cancer Center, we see an elevated number of patients with unplanned resections of soft tissues sarcomas, performed a facilities that do not specialize in this diagnosis and by professionals not trained to do so. Patients have to face many problems result of the unplanned procedure. The idea of our project is to calculate the actual incidence and do a root analysis in an attempt to understand the causes behind this probelm.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

199 Risk of tumor recurrence for high-risk, non-metastatic, pathologically node negative renal cell carcinoma patients undergoing extirpative surgery
Dhyana Sankar, BS, MSIV;  Dhyana Sankar; Jude Nawlo, BS, MSIII; Charles Peyton, MD; Wade Sexton, MD; Philippe Spiess, MD

The objective of this study of this study is to evaluate the risk factors in a cohort of high risk, non-metastatic pathologically node negative renal cell carcinoma patients (≥ pT3a RCC) following extirpative surgery at Moffitt Cancer Center. The risk factors can stratify patients for risk of tumor recurrence.

Presenters
JN

Jude Nawlo

Med II student, Morsani COM


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

200 Environmental Exposures and Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Childhood
Stanford Chun, BS; Jessica Block BS, MS; Volkan Vural PhD; Yannis Katsis PhD; Daniel Crawl PhD; Ilkay Altintas PhD;  Amy Weiss MD, MPH; Jeannie S. Huang MD, MPH

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) often present in adolescence and affect >1.4 million persons in the US. Environmental exposures, notably air pollution and weather, have been suggested to contribute to IBD disease activity. Our goal was to evaluate relationships between environmental exposures and the prevalence and disease activity of pediatric IBD using novel data sources that take into account geographic location.

Presenters
SW

Stanford W Chun

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

201 Cardiovascular complications and mortality determinants in near drowning victims: a 5 year retrospective analysis
Dr. Enrico Camporesi, Dr. Hesham Omar, Prachiti Dalvi, Dr. Mehdi Mirsaeidi, Dr. Gerardo Bosco, Dr. Engy Helal, Dr. Devanand Mangar

Drowning is a major worldwide cause of death in children ages 5-14 and accounts for 7% of all injury related deaths worldwide [1]. In 2012 there were 372,000 drowning-related deaths [2]. Though the mechanism of death in drowning is known to be from cardiopulmonary complications, there scant data on the complications that follow in near-drowning incidents. Ventricular arrhythmias can result in cardiac arrest [3]. Hypothermia is also seen if the patient is submerged in cold water. Coronary artery disease has been shown to be a significant prognostic factor in drowning victims [4]. In recent literature, it has been reported that Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is the cause of ischemic changes seen in near-drowning victim’s ECG’s [5,6]. Our study aims to investigate cardiovascular complications and determinants of mortality in near drowning victims.

Presenters
KM

Kevin Morgan

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

202 Retrospective evaluation of flow cytometry and gene rearrangement analysis of blood and skin biopsies in patients with suspected cutaneous T-cell lymphoma
Julie D. Gibbs, MD; Lucia Seminario, MD, PhD; Elizabeth Sagatys, MD; Jane Messina, MD

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) accounts for 80-85% of all primary cutaneous lymphoma (PCL), and mycosis fungoides is most common, comprising nearly 50% of PCL. Timely definitive diagnosis is essential for appropriate clinical management of CTCL. Ancillary studies such as T-cell receptor gene rearrangement (TCRGR) and flow cytometry (FC) of tissue and blood can augment histopathologic evaluation in confirming a clonal lymphocytic population, yet the value of these studies in early or suspected CTCL has not been systematically investigated. We performed an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of 30 consecutive patients presenting to a cutaneous lymphoma clinic for evaluation of suspected or recurrent CTCL, to evaluate the sensitivity of TCRGR (beta and gamma genes) and FC (analyzing a 10 marker T cell panel) using clinicopathologic diagnosis of mycosis fungoides as the gold standard.

Presenters
JG

Julie Gibbs

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

203 Comparison of outcomes after robotic-assisted lobectomy for pathologic early- versus late-stage primary lung cancer: a 6-year experience. 
Bryce Montané, B.S., Frank O. Velez-Cubian, M.D., Kavian Toosi, B.S., Nirav Patel, Carla C. Moodie, P.A.-C., Joseph R. Garrett, M.P.H., A.R.N.P., Jacques P. Fontaine, M.D., and Eric M. Toloza, M.D., Ph.D.

Surgical resection is still the gold standard for early stages of primary lung cancers. More advanced stages, including nodal involvement, are approached with a multimodality therapy. The purpose of our investigation was to determine the surgical outcomes after robotic-assisted video-thoracoscopic (RAVT) surgery for early versus late primary lung cancer stages.

Presenters
BE

Bryce E. Montane, B.S.

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

204 Bone and Soft Tissue Cytology with Histologic Correlation at a Tertiary Care Center: Diagnostic Pearls and Pitfalls
Lynh Nguyen MD, Dhana Balakrishnan MD, Marilyn Bui MD PhD, and Evita Henderson-Jackson MD

Fine needle aspiration biopsies are a valuable diagnostic tool for primary and metastatic bone and soft tissue sarcomas and play a pivotal role in patient management. However, bone and soft tissue cytology can be challenging, as there are limitations such as morphologic tumor heterogeneity and sampling that affect interpretation of histologic typing and grading. In this study, we examine the accuracy and limitations of fine needle aspirations in diagnosis of soft tissue and bone lesions in a tertiary care setting.

Presenters
LN

Lynh Nguyen, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

205 Secondary Osteoporosis-Associated Fracture Prevention Rates at Lehigh Valley Health Network Cedar Crest and Muhlenberg Campuses
Michael Su, MSII

An assessment of Lehigh Valley Health Network's current compliance to JACHO's Osteoporosis-Associated Fracture Implementation Guide and exploring how a Fracture Liaison Service care coordinator would help improve future complaince rates.

Presenters
MS

Michael Su

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

206 Evaluating the Attentional Bias to Social Threats in Persons with Social Anxiety Disorder
Jerry Trotter, MS, Dr. Sohee Choi, MD, PhD, Dr. Glenn Currier, MD

This research discusses the differences in performance between patients diagnosed with Social Anxiety Disorder and a control population when encountering a social threat.

Presenters
JT

Jerry Trotter

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

207 Role of Hyperbaric Oxygenation in regulating bone turnover in patients with Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head: examining alterations in TNF-a, IL-6, and ROS expression
Abdullah Abou-Samra B.S., Enrico M. Camporesi M.D.

This study highlights hyperbaric oxygenation's anti-inflammatory abilities and reduction in bone turnover in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

Presenters
AA

Abdullah Abou-Samra, B.S.

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

208 Preloading Corneas at the Eye Bank Improves Transplant Outcomes
Avi Robinson, MS, Eric Abdullayev, MD, MBA

Traditionally, transplant surgeons prepare corneal grafts in the operating room prior to surgery. This practice leads to widespread variability which may contribute to cornea transplant complications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of preloading corneas at the level eye bank using a commercially available insertion device. We propose that by reducing variability of the tissue preparation process, outcomes can be improved.

Presenters
AR

Avi-Chai Robinson, MS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

209 The Utility of Asthma Scores in Disposition Decisions for Children with Status Asthmaticus
Kelsey S. Ryan, Scott McKinley, DO,  Jennifer Bartlett, MSN, CPNP, Sorany Son, BS, Michael Wilsey, MD, Thomas Nakagawa, MD, Anthony A. Sochet, MD, MS

The Pediatric Asthma Severity Score (PASS) is a commonly used clinical and research metric for assessing pediatric asthma exacerbation severity. PASS is not validated for practice beyond distinguishing appropriate initial emergency room (ER) disposition. We aimed to determine if PASS predicts a patient's appropriate level of care in the inpatient setting, with special attention to patients who required rapid transfer to another level of care after initial disposition and/or hospital readmission.

Presenters
KS

Kelsey Schuette Ryan, M.D.

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

210 Improving Growth Velocity in Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) infants: a quality improvement (QI) project
Moath Alhamad, MD, Aimen Ben Ayad, MD, Maya Balakrishnan, MD, CSSBB, Kaitlin Sapp, MD, Karen Fugate, MSN RNC-NIC, CPQH

Inadequate postnatal nutritional support in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, particularly protein and energy deficits, may result in growth failure and poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Optimal growth of preterm infants is challenging to achieve. Most preterm infants fail to grow after birth for days, and once they start to grow, they do not sustain normal intrauterine growth rates. This problem is worse in infants who have intrauterine growth restrictions (IUGR), infants with reversed end-diastolic flow (REDF), and infants with serious illnesses and physiological instability. As a result, most preterm infants do not achieve normal anthropometric indices by term gestation. Several reasons are identified for poor postnatal growth and VLBW infants, including: delay in the start of adequate nutrition, providing inadequate rates of macro and micro nutrients, delay in initiation of enteral feeding (due to IUGR or REDF status), use of dilute nutritional mixes (e.g. unfortified human milk (mother’s own or donor), and differences in practices between different neonatal intensive care units and between providers in the same unit. There is a strong evidence in the literature indicating that early aggressive nutritional management for VLBW infants, especially protein and calories, is necessary to achieve normal growth and development during post natal life. To achieve improvement in nutrition and growth outcomes in Tampa general hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), we designed a quality improvement (QI) project that is based on standardize evidence-based NICU feeding guideline with a focus on maximizing protein intake in VLBW infants.

Presenters
MA

Moath Alhamad, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

211 Re-biopsy of Partially-Sampled Thin Melanoma Impacts Sentinel Lymph Node Sampling as well as Surgical Margins
Daniel Lee BS, Evan S. Weitman MD, Matthew C. Perez MD, Vernon K. Sondak MD, Amod A. Sarnaik MD, Ricardo J. Gonzalez MD, Wayne Cruse MD, Jane L Messina MD, Jonathan S. Zager MD

Partially-sampled-melanomas can present quite the dilemma to clinicians. Since the depth of a melanoma dictates its surgical management, it is of utmost importance that the biopsied part of the tumor is representative of its whole. A sample that reads shallower than the true depth can result in additional trips to the operating room, a waste of resources, and all around inefficient care. Conducting a second biopsy on the same lesion can be an option in situations where the depth based on the initial biopsy is in question. However, there is little to no data to either support or refute the usefulness of a re-biopsy. In this study, we sought to assess the impact of additional biopsy of residual pigment and its role in changing surgical management of the primary tumor.

Presenters
DL

Daniel Lee

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

212 Nipple and implant sparing mastectomy is a novel technique for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients with prior breast augmentation
Nicole K. Le, BS, Paul D. Smith, MD, Ambuj Kumar, MD, MPH, Deniz Dayicioglu, MD

We developed a novel, viable, and safe technique of nipple and implant sparing mastectomies for women with breast cancer and a prior breast augmentation.

Presenters
NL

Nicole Le

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

213 Conditional Survival in Women with Breast Cancer: An analysis of 12,154 Patients From a Single Institution
Michael Reintgen, Lauren Kerivan, Eric Reintgen, Morgan Cribbin, Steve Shivers, PhD, Douglas Reintgen, MD, Charles Cox, MD

A conditional survival analysis was performed on the USF Breast cancer database.

Presenters
MR

Michael Reintgen

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

214 Gynecologic Surgeons’ Perspectives on Risk Factors and Prophylaxis of Trocar Site Hernias: A National Survey
Ali Wells, BS; George J. Germanos, MD; Jason L Salemi, PhD, MPH; Emad Mikhail, MD

This national online survey was sent to members of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons in order to assess perspectives on risk factors and prevention for a rare surgical complication. Surgeons were asked to describe the nature of their practice, the number of trocar site hernias (TSH) developed by their patients, and the circumstances of the TSH development. Results were used to describe TSH outcomes and trends in surgical practice based on surgical volume, academic versus private practice, and preferred method of facial closure.

Presenters
AW

Ali Wells

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

215 Talimogene Laherparepvec for the Treatment of Advanced Melanoma : A Single Institution Experience
Matthew C Perez MD, John T. Miura MD, Syeda Mahrukh Hussnain Naqvi MD MPH, Youngchul Kim PhD, Amanda Holstein, Daniel Lee, Amod A. Sarnaik MD, Jonathan S. Zager MD FACS

A review of the use of an intralesionally therapy for locoregionally advanced melanoma.

Presenters
MP

Matthew Perez, MD

Fellow, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

216 Measuring Knowledge Toward Bariatric Surgery in Severely Obese Adolescent Population
Yumna Ahmad, Amy Weiss, MD, MPH, Sadaf Aslam, MD, MS

The purpose of this study is to develop a measure of readiness for bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents. The rate of severe or extreme obesity in adolescents is consistently rising. Youth in this classification of weight are at high risk for developing chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Also, obesity that begins in childhood commonly persists into adulthood increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancers. However, bariatric surgery has been shown to be very effective in reducing BMI and reversing complications of obesity in adulthood. For this reason, bariatric surgery has begun to be used in adolescents as well and thus far has been shown to be a safe, effective, and viable treatment. This is a relatively new field of study on adolescents; nevertheless a 5-year study conducted in Sweden found that severely obese adolescents who opted for surgical intervention lost more weight than adolescents who chose non-interventional methods. In fact, the study found the adolescents who opted for non-interventional methods saw an increase or stagnant weight. As of now, there has not been much success in determining the best quantitative method to choose a candidate for adolescent bariatric surgery. Much of the research has focused on clinical interviews and psychological analysis. In this study, a questionnaire was created about bariatric surgery, life-style changes it entails, and precautions that adolescent patients need to take in diet, exercise, and management. The patient took the questionnaire during the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd visit with the interdisciplinary team, and then during their 6th visit with the interdisciplinary team. The survey was also administered to sixth visit patients who have not been administered the survey at their first visit. In total, the maximum number of times this questionnaire was taken by each subject is 2. It is hypothesized that their score should increase between the 6 visits. The decision made by the team regarding surgical intervention will also be recorded. Through data analysis, it will be determined whether there is a relationship between the score achieved on this test and the decision made by the clinical team. It is hypothesized that adolescent patients that achieve higher scores on the questionnaires will be more likely to be cleared for surgery. This research was supported by the Scholarly Concentrations Program at USF Health, Morsani College of Medicine.

Presenters
YA

Yumna Ahmad

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

217 The Efficacy of a Flash Glucose Monitor in a Pediatric Patient Sample: A Pilot Study of Possible Interference by Ketoacidosis
Gabriela Bou, BS, Michael Wurm, MD, Barbara Hansen, PhD, Karl Schwab, MD

This pilot study analyzes the changes and improvements necessary for further data collection and analysis of the comparison between tissue glucose measurements by the FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitor and blood glucose measurements in pediatric patients with Type 1 Diabetes on a continuum of pH levels ranging from severely ketoacidotic to non-ketoacidotic stable conditions.

Presenters
GB

Gabriela Bou, BS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

218 Trends & Outcomes in the Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease among the elderly population in the State of Florida from 2000 to 2014.
Adarsh Bellur MS, MSIV, Eduardo Rodriguez, Nirmani Karunathilake MS, Peter Nelson MD, MS

This study is aimed at comparing the use of endovascular therapy (vs. bypass) for treatment of peripheral arterial disease among the elderly population (defined as patients 80yrs or older) in the State of Florida from 2000 to 2014.

Presenters
AB

Adarsh Bellur

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

219 Depression, Sleep, Fatigue, and Physical Activity in a Randomized Trial of Ustekinumab for Prevention of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease Following Hematopoietic Cell Transplant
Navdeep Chahal, Aasha I. Hoogland, Heather S.L. Jim, Joseph A.

Pidala Hematopoietic cell transplant patients with acute versus graft host disease commonly experience depression, fatigue, physical inactivity and poor sleep. These symptoms are thought to be a result of a proinflammatory cytokine disease process. Ustekinumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation and shows promising potential as a treatment option to prevent acute versus graft host disease. The aim of the study was to examine if ustekinumab could be associated with reduced depression, fatigue, poor sleep, and physical inactivity in a randomized trial comparing tacrolimus, sirolimus, and ustekinumab to tacrolimus, sirolimus, and placebo.

Presenters
NC

Navdeep Chahal

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

220 An Examination of Treatment Preference in Pediatric Tourette's and Tic Disorder Population
Kalie Pham, BS, Erin Brennan, BA, Danyelle Guido, Tahnin Bluangtook, BS

Tics are repetitive involuntary movements (e.g. blinking) and vocal sounds (e.g. grunting) that may be simple (involving just a few parts of the body, e.g. sniffing) or complex (involving several parts of the body, often with a pattern, e.g. bobbing the head while jerking an arm, and then jumping). Thirty-three parents of children aged 7-17 years with the presence of tics participated in a survey created to measure parent treatment preferences and related factors. Preliminary data revealed concerns related to use of medication for tics.

Presenters
KP

Kalie Pham, BS

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

221 National Outcomes of Donor and Recipient Sex Mismatch in Kidney Transplantation
Vincent Sachs BS, Jacentha Buggs MD, Lei Wang PhD, Ruisheng Liu MD, PhD, Ebonie Rogers BS, Victor Bowers MD

The role of gender remains controversial with respect to outcomes in solid organ transplantation.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

222 Liver Transplantation For Hepatocellular Carcinoma Outperform Other Populations In The New Hepatitis C Era
Robert Burk, BS, Angel Alsina MD, Alexia Athienitis PhD, John Trendowski BS, Alejandro Delgado BS, Jacentha Buggs MD, Brenna Evans RN, Edson Franco MD, Christopher Albers MD, Nyingi Kemmer MD Long term results of HCC liver transplants (LTx) in the recent era of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) against hepatitis C (HCV) are not available.

Presenters
RB

Robert Burk

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

223 Association of radiomics and outcome in esophageal cancer following neoadjuvant chemo-radiation.
India Eaford, BA, MS;  Anupam Rishi, Geoffrey G. Zhang, Alexander Viera, Kujtim Latifi, Jessica Frakes, Jose M. Pimiento, Jacques-Pierre Fontaine, Sarah Hoffe

Radiomics involve comprehensive quantification of tumor phenotypes by throughput extraction of imaging data. It may provide complementary information in clinical decision making. We investigated the association between radiomics and clinical outcomes for esophageal cancer following neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NACRT).

Presenters
IE

India Eaford, BA, MS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

224 Lung Microbiome and Metabolome Differentiates Allograft from Native Lung in Single Lung Transplant Recipients
A.S.Conniff, K.K. Patel, M. Pachinbuvaran, K.M. Wille, D. Weill, J. Deshane, N. S. Sharma

Role of lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

Presenters
AS

Amanda Sales Conniff, PhD

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

225 Exploring Paramedic and Physician Ability to Predict Patient Disposition with a Prehospital Presentation.
Jonathan Littell, M.S., Rachel Semmons, M.D., Jason Wilson, M.D., Andrew Thomas, M.D., Elizabeth Mannion, M.D.

This study aims to characterize the ability of prehospital providers to predict the short-term outcome of patients that they transport to emergency departments. Paramedic ability to accurately predict these outcomes may aid in determining the appropriate destination for patients that they transport. The ability to complete a full evaluation in the field is limited, and we hypothesized that emergency physicians may also have limited ability to predict patient outcome when presented with only prehospital patient history and physical. Management of certain patient chief complaints that are found to be consistently undertriaged (that is, predicted to be discharged when patient actually required admission) may improve as a result of targeted paramedic education or change in prehospital treatment protocols.

Presenters
JL

Jonathan Littell, Jr., MS, EMT-P

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

226 A Single-Center, Prospective, Measurement of Adherence to Treatment with Tecfidera in Multiple Sclerosis Patients
Ryan Collier, BS; Jhulianna Vivar, BS, BA; Angela Aungst, MPH; Crystal Dixon, MD; Lise Casady, ARNP-C; Derrick Robertson, MD

Tecfidera was the first FDA approved oral disease-modifying treatment for relapsing forms of MS that requires twice daily dosing. The use of an oral therapy may be more desirable to a patient compared to an injectable therapy, leading to improved adherence. Twice daily dosing for a chronic condition in patients with the potential for additional co-morbidities which may affect adherence should be studied in order to obtain data to assist practitioners and guide clinical practice when this treatment option is selected. This aim of this research was to analyze barriers to adherence for patients treated with Tecfidera.

Presenters
RC

Ryan Collier, BS

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

227 Differences in Radiosensitivity Between Metastatic and Primary Breast Cancers
Casey L. Liveringhouse BA, Kamran A. Ahmed MD, Jacob Purcell BS, Matthew N. Mills BS, G. Daniel Grass MD PhD, Amber G. Orman MD, Javier F. Torres-Roca MD, Roberto Diaz MD PhD

The Radiosensitivity Index (RSI) is a multigene assay that predicts for the intrinsic radiosensitivity of a tumor. In this study, we assessed the RSI of primary and metastatic breast tumor samples from the tissue biorepository at Moffitt Cancer center. We found that primary breast tumors are more radioresistant than metastatic breast tumors. These findings may help inform radiation dose selection in breast cancer patients in both the primary and oligometastatic setting.

Presenters
CL

Casey Liveringhouse, BA

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

228 MRSA screening for surgical site infection prevention prior to hysterectomy at a cancer center
Michelle Kuznicki, MD, MA, Mallen A, Robertson S, Todd S, Boulware D, Martin S, McClung EC, Apte S

Retrospective cohort study looking at patterns of MRSA screening in a population of patients undergoing hysterectomy.

Presenters
ML

Michelle Lee Kuznicki, MD, MA

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

229 Impact of Dietary Habits on Wellness, Fitness, and Injury Characteristics of Firefighters
Matthias Oawster, sDPT, Genia Gartman, sDPT, Justin Whelchel, sDPT, Charity L. Lane, MS, MA, CPT, FNS, USAW, Nicole Santos, BS, CRA-USF, Thomas Janus, BS, CPT, John M. Mayer, DC, PhD, CCRP, FACSM

This cross-sectional study assesses the impact of dietary habits on wellness, fitness, and injury characteristics of firefighters enrolled in a federally-funded injury prevention trial.

Presenters
MO

Matthias Oawster

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

230 Efficacy of 1 cm Resection Margins in Merkel Cell Carcinoma
Amanda Holstein, Matthew C. Perez MD, Felipe R. de Pinho MD, Erin Burke MD, Syeda Mahrukh Hussnain Naqvi MD MPH, Youngchul Kim PhD, Jane L. Messina MD, Ricardo J. Gonzalez MD, Amod A. Sarnaik MD, C. Wayne Cruse MD, Louis B. Harrison MD, Vernon K. Sondak MD, Jonathan S. Zager MD

An analysis of local recurrance, disease-specific survival, overall survival and type of wound closure based on surgical margins for treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma.

Presenters
AH

Amanda Holstein, MS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

231 The Effects of Thoracodorsal Nerve Division on Overall Aesthetics and Complications in Breast Reconstruction after Skin Sparing Mastectomy
Gabrielle Gostigian, Deniz Dayicioglu MD

Latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps are commonly used for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction and greatly enhance aesthetic results. Some reserach supports benefits from denervation of the thoracodorsal nerve while others deem it unnecessary. Therefore, this study seeks to measure patient satisfaction following deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) breast reconstruction surgery at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute and Tampa General Hospital.

Presenters
GG

Gabrielle Gostigian

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

232 Next Generation Sequencing of immunized mouse splenocytes to Develop an anti-TIM3 Chimeric Antigen Receptor for Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Lawrence Guan, BS, Justin C Boucher, PhD, Paresh Vishwasrao, PhD, Bishwas Shrestha, PhD, Gongbo Li, PhD, Scott Christley, PhD, Lindsay G Cowell, PhD, Jared Ostmeyer, PhD, William H Rounds, PhD, Inimary T Toby, PhD, Marco L Davila, MD, PhD

We designed a novel chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy targeting Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) using next generation sequencing (NGS). NGS allows for direct identification of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, mutation and repertoire analysis, and comparison of multiple immunized mice, bypassing the traditional, time consuming method of hybridoma production, screening, and immunoglobulin sequencing. These novel anti-TIM3 CARs have demonstrated efficacy, persistence, and activation in vitro.

Presenters
LG

Lawrence Guan, MD

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

233 Head and Neck Cancer Patient Navigation Process Improvement at Bay Pines VA
Joseph Luke O'Neill, MS, Zyad Asi, Joann Fenicchia, Cindy Bowman, RN, MSN, OCN

Process improvement project using Lean Six Sigma to reduce the time it takes patients to go from diagnosis to treatment initiation.

Presenters
JL

Joseph Luke O'Neill, II, MS

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

234 A Survey Analysis of the Frequency of Dermatologic Monitoring in Transplant Patients
Leigh Hatch, BS, Nishit Patel, MD, Douglas Laurain, MD, Ambuj Kumar, MD, Erfon Ekhlassi, MD

Transplant patients are at high risk for developing skin cancers due to highly immunosuppressive drug regimens. A retrospective survey was sent to the Tampa General Hospital transplant population to better understand if these patients are getting the necessary dermatologic monitoring.

Presenters
LA

Leigh Ann Hatch

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

235 Retrospective Analysis of the Safety and Efficacy of Intrasaccular WEB devices in the Management of Cerebral Aneurysms at Hull Royal Infirmary
Shailaja Emani, BS; Paul Maliakal, MBBS, MRCP, FRCR; Ambuj Kumar, MD, MPH

The goal of this project is to complete a safety and efficacy profile on Woven EndoBridge Devices (WEB) in the treatment of complex intra-cranial anuerysms. WEB devices are a type of intrasaccular flow disrupter that have been developed to treat intracranial aneurysms, particularly those with unfavorable anatomy (such as wide-neck and bifurcation anuerysms) in both ruptured and unruptured aneyrusms. These areas are normally difficult to resolve with the original coiling methods. Initial results have shown low complications and morbidity, and may allow for a significant improvement in patient outcome. The device was licensed for use in Summer of 2013, and Hull Royal Infirmary has used over 30 of these devices in their hospital and preliminary data has produced positive results in regards to safety and efficacy. It is essential to quantify this data and provide more insight into the benefit of these devices over using the original "coiling" methodology. This project will identify the impact of these fairly new devices as a more safe and effective treatment for these complex surgical cases, and potentially improve the outcomes of patients with intra-cranial aneurysms significantly. This project will be assessing the new, cutting-edge WEB device that will be used in many future cases of aneurysms, and will provide quantified data about a device that could significantly improve patient safety, effectiveness, and overall outcome.

Presenters
SE

Shailaja Emani

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

236 Post-PDA ligation syndrome with Hypertension and masking of Renal Artery Stenosis in an Infant
Erica E. E. Peterson, M.D.,Daniel Mauriello, M.D.

Following ductus arteriosus ligation hypertension has been infrequently described. This case demonstrates how pathology that increases systemic vascular resistance, such as renal artery stenosis can be masked by the parallel circuit physiology of a patent ductus arteriosus.

Presenters
EE

Erica Elizabeth ElSeed Peterson, MD

Resident, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

237 Gait Modification Following Asymmetrical Rhythmic Auditory Cueing
Kelsey Ulliman, Brian Bernal, Sarah Besaly, Sarah Woody, Fatemeh Rasouli, Kyle Reed, PhD, Seok Hun Kim, PT, PhD

This study is to investigate if asymmetric rhythmic auditory cueing (ARAC) could modify gait symmetry in healthy individuals.

Presenters
KU

Kelsey Ulliman

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

238 Feeding Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: Finding the Sweet Spot
Leah Clark, BS, Denise Maguire, PhD, RN, CNL, FAAN, Emily Shaffer-Hudkins, PhD, Kathleen Armstrong, PhD

Infants born to drug addicted mothers are at risk for developing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, which is often associated with difficulty feeding. We organized focus groups with nurses and speech therapists from three regional hospitals to better understand their strategies for feeding. We found that the most helpful strategies for successful feeding included remaining calm, helping keep the infant calm, and recognizing the infants cues.

Presenters
LC

Leah Clark

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

239 Review of Hypertension Management at USF BRIDGE Clinic
Atkinson B, Uichanco L, Kattih Z, Perera Y, Angell E, Uhlar C, Martinez V, Roetzheim A, Lopez J, Roetzheim R, MD, Guerra, L, MD, Gonzalez, E, MD

An analysis of hypertension management in patients at the BRIDGE student-run free clinic as compared to national averages and blood pressure at initial visit.

Presenters
BA

Brian Atkinson

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

240 Multi-Methodological Examination of Advance Care Planning (ACP) from Different Perspectives to Understand Knowledge, Barriers, and Perceptions Surrounding This Topic
Aleksandra Bacewicz, MPH, Nicole Defenbaugh, PhD

This project is an analysis of medical culture surrounding Advance Care Planning (ACP) and related issues, as seen through various "lenses." This project assessed ACP perceptions, knowledge, and barriers to having discussions about ACP among community members and medical providers and staff. An understanding of medical culture was elucidated through quantitative research, as well as qualitative research methods that include ethnography.

Presenters
AB

Aleksandra Bacewicz, MD, MPH

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

241 Project Trust: A Qualitative Study on Physician Trust in Patients
Alena Golubkova, MS4, Janet Lee, MS4

Trust is the foundation for any healthy relationship and yet it is difficult to define. It is multidimensional and can be influenced by one’s experiences, beliefs, and prejudices. In any relationship, trust is bi-directional, and the patient-physician relationship is no exception. Studies have focused on patient trust in the physician, but few have investigated physician trust in the patient. In a relationship defined by risk, uncertainty, and interdependence, building trust between the patient and physician is crucial. Our study aimed to address this paucity in the literature, the healthcare outcomes, and potentially bring awareness to a more mindful medical practice model.

Presenters
AG

Alena Golubkova

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

242 Absence of Shared Decision-Making in Patients Receiving Physical Therapy for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Thematic Synthesis of Qualitative Studies.
Dr. Douglas Haladay, DPT, PhD, MS, BS; Wells Pierce, BS; Amy Shehadeh, BA; Kristen Smith, BS; Brittany Wert, BS

Shared decision making could be the potential mechanism for opening the door to better treatment outcomes in patients with low back pain. Patients are treated as passive agents rather than participating in their own treatment due therapist neglect in considering their preferences. The lack of patient involvement creates a power asymmetry among the patient and therapist resulting in the patient wanting to be more involved in their treatment. This review of qualitative studies identified the lack of implementation of shared decision making in physical therapy despite the growing necessity to improve treatment outcomes in patients with low back pain.

Presenters
BW

Brittany Wert

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

243 Evaluating the Educational Effectiveness and Enjoyment of the Teaching Methods used in the Pre-health Scholars Program
Bradley Maller, Bachelor of Science, Jordan Karsch, Bachelor of Science, Matthew Lazarra, Bachelor of Science, Kevin Casey, Master of Education

The Pre-health Scholars Program (PSP) is a six-week summer educational program for USF pre-medicine undergraduates who are considered under-represented in medicine. In order to optimize this learning experience for the PSP students, this study saught to evaulate the effectiveness and enjoyment of seven teaching methods used during PSP.

Presenters
BM

Bradley Maller

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

244 Differential Success and Resilience in Second Career Medical Students
Eric E. Hopkins, B.S.; Danielle Gulick, M. Ed., Ph.D.

This study explores the effects of age and prior career on USMLE Step 1 performance and rates of depression in students for whom medicine constitutes a second career.

Presenters
EE

Eric E. Hopkins, B.S.

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

245 Death and Dying through the Lens of Medical Humanities: A Curriculum Proposal
Lauren Walter, BS

Over the past few decades, care of dying patients – including effective communication, compassionate care, use of advanced directives, palliative care options, and physician-assisted dying - has received increasing attention from the medical community and the public. Medical education is central to improvement of physician competency and compassion in end of life (EOL) care. While the importance of educating medical students on EOL care is recognized worldwide, medical students often feel they are not adequately prepared to navigate EOL issues. In response to this need many new EOL educational experiences have been developed, including coursework in Medical Humanities (MH). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the current use of MH in teaching death and dying, investigate perspectives on EOL presented through the humanities, and ultimately create a MH curriculum module on death and dying.

Presenters
LW

Lauren Walter

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

246 The Alchemist — A Podcast Devoted to Mitigating Burnout by Finding the Magic in Medicine
Christopher J. Schwartz, BS, James Denham, MS

Burnout is a term used to describe a state of mental and physical exhaustion. Medical education is rigorous, and it's design can have detrimental effects on the health of it's trainees. Studies have suggested that students who report higher levels of social support, as well as those who use personal strategies to find meaning in their training, are less likely to have burnout symptoms. To that end, the authors sought to create a podcast devoted to mitigating burnout by increasing student understanding of medicine through a storied exploration of the people, places, and things that inhabit USF health.

Presenters
CS

Christopher Schwartz

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

247 Assessing the Perceived and Actual Effectiveness of Teaching Methods in the Pre-health Scholars Program
Jordan Karsch, B.S., Matthew Lazzara, B.S., Bradley Maller, B.S., Kevin Casey, M.E.D., Shirley Smith, M.A.

The Pre-health Scholars Program (PSP) is a multi-year academic enrichment and career exploration program for pre-health students from groups that are under-represented in medicine that begins as a six-week summer education program. In order to optimize this learning experience for the PSP students in the summer program, this study sought to evaluate the effectiveness and enjoyment of seven teaching methods used during PSP.

Presenters
JK

Jordan Karsch, BS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

248 Medical Humanities in Medical Education, particularly pediatrics
Vanessa Bray, BA, Vinita Kiluk, MD

The study of medical humanities through visual and verbal representations can shed let on ethical dilemmas that aren’t always presented within the packed medical school curriculum.

Presenters
VT

Vanessa Taylor Bray, BA

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

249 Comparison of Medical Student Burnout in a Pass/Fail vs. Four-Tiered Pre-Clerkship Grading System
Katherine Allen BS, Chelsea Wilson MPAS, LesleAnn Hayward BS, Philip Bowers BS BA, Aleksandra Bacewicz MPH, Danielle Gulick PhD

This study compares burnout rates of medical students at USF Morsani College of Medicine in a pass/fail versus four-tiered grading system using the Maslach Burnout Inventory to determine potential effects of the grading system on student wellness.

Presenters
avatar for Katherine R Allen, BS

Katherine R Allen, BS

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

250 Assessment of Nutritional Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Professional Health Students
Madeline Rollins, MSII, Rahul Mhaskar, MPH, PhD

This descriptive cross-sectional study investigated the knowledge, attitutdes, and beliefs of professional health students regarding nutrition. We designed a survey after holding focus groups with MD, DPT, and PharmD students. We then administered the survey via email to all enrolled students for the 2016-2017 academic year. We investigated variables such as personal nutrition habits, trusted sources of nutrition information, necessity of nutrition education, and ability to counsel patients on nutrition.

Presenters
MR

Madeline Rollins

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

251 The Significance and Efficacy of Teaching About Health Disparities in Pediatrics Residency
Alicia Lew, B.S., Vinita Kiluk, M.D., Amy Weiss, M.D.

Significant health disparities exist for various pediatric patient populations depending on socioeconomic status and sexual orientation. Addressing medical conditions ranging from infant mortality to obesity and asthma within these populations varies due to the lack of a structured curriculum concerning LGBT adolescents and children living in poverty. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the importance and effectiveness of teaching these topics to pediatric residents.

Presenters
AL

Alicia Lew, B.S.

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

252 Assessment of Physical Therapist Student Perceptions of Social Media and Professional Behaviors Regarding Social Media Postings
Manali Patel, SPT; Kasey Crawford, SPT; Adam Fagan, SPT

The purpose of the study was to survey physical therapist students enrolled in professional physical therapy programs regarding their social media usage, familiarity with social media policies, and to examine how students would judge behaviors of others using social media.

Presenters
MP

Manali Patel

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

253 A Review of Patient Safety Curricula in U.S. Medical Schools
Sabrina Khalil, Rahul Mhaskar, MPH, PhD

This project aims to review the literature and survey curriculum directors about patient safety education for undergraduate medical students in terms of curricular objectives, methods of program evaluation, teaching formats, student audience (class year), student assessment methods, and barriers to patient safety education implementation.

Presenters
SK

Sabrina Khalil

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

254 WITHDRAWN Impact of a Medical Student Taught Health Science Program on High School Student's Interest and Confidence in STEM as a Future Career Choice
Haley Frauen, MD Candidate; Bryce Montane, MD Candidate; Dr. Dawn Schocken, PhD, MPH

A seven module health science curriculum with STEM career correlations was was taught to a group of loca high school students who were noted to be at risk for not graduating. A pre and post survey was given to the students before and after the program and the students interest and confidence in a future career in STEM was studied.

Presenters
HF

Haley Frauen, MD

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

255 Improving the competitiveness of undeserved and underrepresented minorities applying to health professional school
Ricardo Rendel B.S, M.S, Shirley Smith M.A, Kevin Casey M.ED

PROJECT STILL ONGOING, EXPECTED COMPLETION JANUARY 2018

Working with the Pre-Health Scholars program, through the Office of Student Diversity and Enrichment, 12 students were enrolled in a 6-week summer course with the goal to provide an educational experience that changes the way these students approach their undergraduate academics. The hope is after the course students will improve GPA, MCAT (or other standardized entry exams). Clinical experiences also made available to the students to supplement their CV and improve competitiveness. Long-term goal is to establish a reproducible model for other health professional programs to adopt and modify to improve disparity of URM and underrepresented populations in medicine.

Presenters
RR

Ricardo Rendel, B.S., M.S.

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

256 From Trafficked to Treated: Training Healthcare Professionals to Become Victim Advocates
Kristal T. Ha, MS; Antoinette Spoto-Cannons, MD

Healthcare professionals are uniquely positioned for opportunities to identify victims of human trafficking within clinical settings, but often fail to do so as a result of several factors, one of which is inadequate training. If we as a healthcare community can identify gaps in knowledge and appropriately address them in meaningful and effective ways, we can equip healthcare workers with the tools to not only identify patients who may be victims of trafficking, but also engage them and provide sufficient resources to ensure their overall wellbeing.

Presenters
KT

Kristal T. Ha, MS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

257 Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of Sex, Age, and Symmetry in Proximal Femurs from Computed Tomography
Chelsea A. Sparks, BS, Summer J. Decker, PhD, Jonathan M. Ford, PhD

The success of a total hip arthroplasty is directly related to the ability of the implant to match original femoral morphology. Given this critical relationship, we characterized normal proximal femoral morphology as it relates to sex, age, and symmetry through measurements obtained from three-dimensional models constructed from computed tomography scans.

Presenters
CS

Chelsea Sparks

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

258 Categorizing Hospital Quality for Ovarian Cancer Survival within the Nurses' Health Studies
Mallen AR, MD; Townsend MK, ScD; Tworoger SS, PhD

We sought to assess the association between type of hospital where primary cytoreductive surgery was performed and survival among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

259 Trends in Pattern of Disease in Penile Cancer: Concerns Raised by the National Cancer Data Base
Sharon Chaing, MS; Juan Chipollini, MD; Laura C. Kidd, MD; Anna R. Giuliano, Ph.D.; Peter A.S. Johnstone, M.D.; Philippe E. Spiess, M.D., FACS

Penile cancer has been thought to be a relatively rare malignancy with decreasing incidence in the western world however, concerning recent literature reports have shown increased incidence in the Netherlands, Denmark, and England. Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounts for 95% of penile cancers. Thus, this present study analyzed current trends in penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and sought to identify socioeconomic predictors for locally-advanced (pT3/T4) presentation within the United States, between 1998 and 2012, using the National Cancer Data Base, a large, nationwide cancer registry.

Presenters
SC

Sharon Chaing

Med I student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

260 Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) Indications and Utilization Trends in Khon Kaen, Thailand
Brian Samuels, BS; Kaela Schultz, BSN; Lynette Menezes, PhD; Nisit Tongsiri, MD

Our study describes the indications and utilization of ERCP at Khon Kaen Hospital with the goal of improving risk-stratification and use of resources. Khon Kaen Hospital is a large tertiary referral center located in NE Thailand. This region has the highest incidence of cholangiocarcinoma worldwide and, as a result, a high utilization of ERCP for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

Presenters
BS

Brian Samuels, B.S.

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

261 Increasing the Utilization of Transcutaneous Bilirubin Measurements in Preterm Infants: A Quality Improvement Initiative
Amy Mickelsen MS, Kelly Driver DO, Rahul Mhaskar MPH, PhD, Maya Balakrishnan MD, CSSBB

Infants 28 weeks GA. Increasing TCB use in this population may reduce iatrogenic anemia, potentially painful blood sampling, and healthcare costs.  

Presenters
avatar for Amy L. Mickelsen, MS

Amy L. Mickelsen, MS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

262 Measuring Functional Outcomes in Patients After TKA: A Systematic Review
Rachel Sheffield SPT, Rachel Harrington SPT, Kathy Nguyen SPT, Aimee Klein DPT, DSc, OCS

A systematic review to determine which performance-based measures are indicated for clinically meaningful outcomes in patients following unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

Presenters
RS

Rachel Sheffield

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

263 Lymph Node Density as Prognostic Factor for Short- and Long-Term Outcomes following Robotic-Assisted Pulmonary Lobectomy for Primary Lung Cancer
Roger L. Gerard, B.S., Frank O. Velez-Cubian, M.D., Danny T. Nguyen, B.S., Marisa Amaral, M.D., Carla C. Moodie, P.A.-C., Joseph R. Garrett, M.P.H., A.R.N.P., Jacques P. Fontaine, M.D., and Eric M. Toloza, M.D., Ph.D.

Lymph node (LN) involvement refers to whether original cancer cells have migrated to regional or distal lymph LNs. In regard to lung cancer, LN status is unequivocally one of the most important factors in determining lung cancer stage, treatment and prognosis. Further, lymph node density (LND) is the ratio between the number of positive lymph nodes excised and the total number of excised lymph nodes. In this study, we sought to determine whether LND serves as a predictor of short- or long-term outcomes after pulmonary lobectomy, and in turn assist in identifying patients whom may benefit from more aggressive management or adjuvant therapy.

Presenters
RL

Roger L. Gerard, BS

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

264 Standardizing Patient Care at Lehigh Valley Health Network: Development and Implementation of a Clinical Pathway for Elective Spine Surgery
Catherine Doyle, Cathyann Feher RN, MSN, Brian Leader, Christopher Lycette MD

Clinical pathways have been shown to reduce risk of adverse events, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce length of stay and associated costs through standardization of care. Considering the lack of established spine pathways and expected increase in spine surgeries performed, development and assessment of spine clinical pathways is critical for future practice.

Presenters
CD

Catherine Doyle, BS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

265 HSF-1 is a Regulator of miRNA Expression in Caenorhabditis Elegans
Alana Snyder; Jessica Brunquell, Ph.D.; Feng Cheng, Ph.D.; Sandy D. Westerheide, Ph.D.

The transcription factor HSF-1 was found to regulate development, metabolism, and longevity through control of microRNA expression in C. elegans.

Presenters
AS

Alana Snyder

Med I student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

266 Germline MUC4 Variations that Match Somatic Cancer MUC4 Variations are Common in Cancer Databases and are Associated with Reduced Disease-Free Survival Rates
Shayan Falasiri, MSII, Dr. George Blanck, Ph.D.

Human mutagenesis has a large stochastic component.  Thus, large coding regions, especially cytoskeletal and extra-cellular matrix protein (CECMP) coding regions are particularly vulnerable to mutations. Recent results have verified a high level of somatic mutations in the CECMP coding regions in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA), and a relatively common occurrence of germline, deleterious mutations in the TCGA breast cancer dataset. Here we report the occurrence of germline, and in some cases, matching somatic, CECMP single nucleotide variations (SNVs) for most of the datasets in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA).

Presenters
SF

Shayan Falasiri

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

267 Identification of Specific Feed-Forward Apoptosis Mechanisms and Associated Higher Survival Rates for Low Grade Glioma and Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Dhiraj Sikaria MS2, Yaping N. Tu, Diana Fisler, James Mauro, George Blanck

This study dissects and describes specific pathways that are assessed as either pro-proliferative or pro-apoptotic in patient cancers through a framework of the feed-forward apoptosis mechanism

Presenters
RS

Raj Sikaria, MD

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

268 Seroepidemiology of Hepatitis among Patients Receiving Care at Kasturba Hospital in Mumbai, India
O'Shaine Brown, MS; Jayanthi Shastri, MD, Sachee Agrawal, MD; Lynette Menezes, PhD, LesleAnn Hayward, BS; Mikaela Aradi, BS; Rahul Mhaskar, MPH, PhD

We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of consecutive adult patients suspected of viral hepatitis infection who presented to Kasturba Hospital for Infectious Disease in Mumbai, India from January to December 2014. We extracted demographic and diagnostic data from an electronic database. We also extracted admission laboratory findings corresponding to each eligible patient from physical log books. We sought to determine the seroprevalence of Hepatitis A, B, C, and E among the study population. We performed descriptive analysis to identify potential demographic risk factors associated with the different types of hepatitis. We evaluated admission laboratory findings among each type of hepatitis.

Presenters
OB

O'Shaine Brown

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

269 A Strategy for Disease Surveillance in a Limited Resource Setting, A Pilot Study in Two Communities in Managua, Nicaragua
Chelsea Schmitt, M.S.; Jaime Corvin, Ph.D.

A method that integrates Epicollect and Google Earth in order to track community health data in an area with limited Internet availability and localizing features.

Presenters
CS

Chelsea Schmitt

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

271 fH Generation: Sustaining the Cedro Galan Health Initiative Through Careers in Healthcare
Julia Rauchfuss, BS; Elimarys Perez-Colon, MD

forwardHEALTH Generation developed a curriculum in the format of a career fair to promote careers in healthcare among students in a rural community in Nicaragua facing a deficit of access to healthcare, as professionals of rural origin are most likely to go into rural practice, and measured the influence of the career fair on participant's career planning through pre-post surveys.

Presenters
JR

Julia Rauchfuss

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

272 Prevalence of Elevated Intraocular Pressure in Rural Southern Zambia
Yohan Perera BS, N Charavanapavan MBBS, H.N. Monze ZOS, Z Kattih BS, L Menezes PhD, Carla Bourne MD

I traveled to Livingstone, Zambia and conducted a cross-sectional study investigating the prevalence of elevated intraocular pressure using rebound tonometry throughout rural villages in Kazungula district, southern Zambia. Elevated intraocular pressure is a major risk factor for developing glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness in sub-Saharan Africa.

Presenters
YP

Yohan Perera

Med IV student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

273 WITHDRAWN Repeat Problems: Combinatorial Effect of C9orf72 Derived Dipeptide Repeat Proteins
April Darling, Leonid Braydo, Dali Zheng, Jeremy D. Baker, Laura J. Blair, Chad A. Dickey, John Koren III, Vladimir N. Uversky

The major genetic cause of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia is a hexanucleotide expansion mutation in the 5' UTR of the gene C9orf72. Expansion leads to C9orf72 loss of function, RNA foci formation, and six species of dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins (GA, GP, PG, GR, PA, and PR) of both the sense and antisense varieties. Each sense and antisense DPR species can be simultaneously expressed in a cell of a patient with the mutation. Here, we examined the interplay between the sense species GA and its antisense partner PR and determined that mixing alters the peptides structure and morphology as well as toxicity and localization in cells as compared to when the peptides are expressed individually.

Presenters
AL

April L. Darling, BS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

274 The critical of TPL2 in Clostridium difficile-caused inflammation
Shaohui Wang, Ph D; Yuanguo Wang, Ph D; Zhong Peng, Ph D; Hanping Feng, Ph D; Andrew Greenberg,Ph D; Xingmin Sun, Ph D

Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase, and is a major inflammatory mediator in immune cells. The predominant inflammatory actions of TPL2 depend on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and the upregulated production of cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in macrophages and dendritic cells in response to LPS. A significant increase of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-β in patients with C. difficile infection (CDI) has been reported. Both TNF-α and IL-6 have been postulated to play a key role in the systemic inflammatory response in CDI, and IL-8 is essential in the development of local intestinal inflammatory responses in CDI. The objective of this study is to elucidate the role of TPL2 in the pathogenesis of CDI. We found TPL2 are significantly upregulated and activated in human and mouse intestinal tissues upon C. difficile toxin exposure or CDI. We further demonstrated TPL2 knockout mice were significantly more resistant than wild-type mice to CDI with significantly reduced production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-β, KC (a mouse homologue of IL-8) and MPO in the cecum and colon of the TPL2 knockout mice. Finally, we found that TPl2 inhibition by a specific inhibitor or TPL2 gene ablation significantly reduced TcdB-induced production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-β, KC by inhibiting activation of p38, Erk, and JNK. Taken together, our data suggest TPL2 represents a potential therapeutic target for CDI treatment.

Presenters
SW

Shaohui Wang

Faculty, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

275 The in vitro role of BMI1 in Acute Lung Injury
Helena Hernández-Cuervo B. Sc. M.D., Venkata Narala Ph D., Ramani Soundararajan Ph.D., Jutaro Fukumoto, M.D. Ph.D., Mason Breitzig B.Sc, Matthew Alleyn B.Sc, Sahebgowda Patil M.Sc., Lakshmi Galam Ph.D., Narasaiah Kolliputi Ph.D.

In order to determine if BMI1 expression is related to acute lung injury, we cultured Human epithelial lung cells under conditions of normoxia and hyperoxia. In our experiments, we observed a decrease in BMI1 expression after 48h of hyperoxia. H441 cells lacking BMI1 expression showed changes in their morphology, production of reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial membrane potential.

Presenters
MH

Maria Hernandez

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

276 Alda-1 shields endothelial cells against oxidative stress via activation of ALDH2
Sahebgowda Patil, Venkata R. Narala, Helena Hernández-Cuervo, Byeong Jake Cha, Jutaro Fukumoto, Mason T. Breitzig, Richard F. Lockey, Narasaiah Kolliputi, Lakshmi Galam

The dysfunction of blood supply in lungs can be treated.

Presenters
SS

Sahebgowda Sidramagowda Patil

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

277 Dialysis of an Unknown Cytosolic Cofactor Results in Partial, Delayed Activation of TRPA1
Thomas A. Parks, M.S.; Thomas Taylor-Clark, Ph.D.

There is a discrepancy in the rates of activation of the TRPA1 channel in whole-cell patch clamp and Ca^2+ imaging assays. To determine the cause of this discrepancy, I utilized non-invasive patch clamp techniques to observe if normal TRPA1 activation can be rescued.

Presenters
TA

Thomas A Parks, MS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

278 In silico characterization of novel activators of PTEN lipid phosphatase function
Jacob Wilson, Emily Palumbo, Fiona Kearns, Peng Teng, Prerna Malaney, Vladimir Uversky, Jianfeng Cai, H Lee Woodcock, Vrushank Davé

PTEN is a crucial tumor suppressor that is commonly mutated or down-regulated in several diseases, which aberrantly activates oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling. Chemotherapeutic agents and kinase inhibitors (KIs) have met with off-target effects and chemoresistance. We hypothesize that direct activation of endogenous PTEN will reduce aberrant PI3K signaling and minimize the dose of chemotherapeutic or KIs. We have identified and characterized novel small molecules (γ-AAPeptides), which are the first to directly activate PTEN function. Herein, we have utilized in silico methods to elucidate the interaction between these small molecules and PTEN. Furthermore, we will employ in vitro mutational analysis to corroborate our results of proposed integral residues. In summary, we have used in vitro and in silico analysis to define and characterize the first direct PTEN activators.

Presenters
JW

Jacob Wilson

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

279 Evaluation of the impact of the traditional medicine formulation Goreisan and its components on mesenteric lymphatic vessel contraction and lymphatic endothelial barrier function.
Michiko Jo, Andrea N. Trujillo, Naotoshi Shibahara and Jerome W. Breslin

The Kampo medicine Goreisan is a known diuretic and is currently being tested in the clinic to reduce symptoms of surgically induced lymphedema in OB/GYN patients in Japan. The present study was aimed to clarify how Goreisan and its five different components affect lymphatic pump function. The results suggest that Goreisan does not directly affect lymphatic pumping or barrier function, although at its component Alismatis Rhizoma can influence pump activity and Polyporus can enhance barrier function. By extension, in the lymphedema patients treated with Goreisan, its pharmacological action is more likely to be on renal mechanism to reduce excess body fluids.

Presenters
MJ

Michiko Jo, PhD

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

280 Regulation of miRNA Switches Depends on Nucleotide Modification, Number of Target Sites and Complementarity
John Lockhart BS. MS., John Canfield, Ezinne Mong, Jeffrey VanWye, Hana Totary-Jain

mRNA-based therapeutics represent a promising category of biological drugs. Recently, microRNA-regulated in vitro transcribed mRNAs, called miRNA switches, have been used to successfully target the expression of exogenous mRNA in a cell-selective manner. However, the effect of the nucleotide modifications commonly used in miRNA switches on microRNA-dependent silencing has not been examined. Here we show that pseudouridine-modified and unmodified miRNA switches are equally silenced by microRNA, but pseudouridine/5-methylcytosine-modified miRNA switches are affected by microRNA target site sequence. However, both pseudouridine- and pseudouridine/5-methylcytosine-modified miRNA switches are less effectively when using miRNA seed target sites.

Presenters
JH

John H Lockhart, MS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

281 Exposure to Pyridostigmine Bromide, DEET, and Chlorpyrifos in a Mouse Model of Gulf War Illness
Whitney A. Ratliff, Ph.D., David C. Driscoll, and Bruce A. Citron, Ph.D.

Approximately 25-35% of veterans who served in the 1990-1991 Gulf War experience chronic and multi-symptom illnesses that have been collectively termed “Gulf War Illness”. Symptoms include fatigue, musculoskeletal changes, gastrointestinal symptoms and respiratory difficulty, as well as neurological symptoms such as mood and cognitive changes, depression and anxiety. The exact cause of these symptoms is still unknown, however, research suggests that exposure to multiple toxins in the course of military service and deployment to the Persian Gulf may be a contributing factor. Uniquely, these service members were given prophylactic dosing of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine bromide (PB), to protect against the possibility of a nerve gas attack. Additionally, service members were exposed to significant quantities of insecticides, both through personal use of DEET-based repellants and through environmental exposure to organophosphates, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF). We’ve developed a mouse model of Gulf War Illness that recapitulates the multidimensional toxin exposure of Gulf War veterans.

Presenters
WA

Whitney A. Ratliff, Ph.D.

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

282 Regulatory T-Cells (Tregs) Within Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells (BMSCs) Actively Confer Immunomodulatory and Neuroprotective Effects Against Stroke
Elliot G. Neal, MS/BSE; Sandra A. Acosta, PhD; Yuji Kaneko, PhD; Cesar V. Borlongan, PhD

In the present study, we investigated BMSCs for the presence T_regs, and found a distinct subpopulation of CD4^+/CD25^+/FoxP3^+ T_regs.  We found that the neuroprotective effect of T_regs and BMSCs in co-culture varied in a ratio-dependent manner. We found that T_regs were capable of minimizing stem cell production of IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine and that increasing the concentration of T_regs inhibits BMSC secretion of FGF-b, a cytokine related to BMSC proliferation and differentiation.  We showed the ratio of T_regs found natively in BMSCs is optimally adapted to provide the maximum neuroprotective benefit of stem cell treatment after ischemic stroke.

Presenters
EG

Elliot George Neal, MS/BSE

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

283 WITHDRAWN role of USP19 at TDP-43 proteinopathy
Yan Yan, Liu Tian, JungA woo, Azd, Patrick Lepochat, Azd Al-Mashal, David Kang, PhD

TAR DNA-binding protein 43 KDa (TDP-43) mislocalization is a pathological hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. TDP-43 is predominantly nuclear, but under “pathological” conditions, it is translocated to the cytosol where it is ubiquitinated and/or phosphorylated and cleaved into smaller fragments. Ubiquitin Specific Peptidase 19 (USP19) is one of the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) involved in regulating the ubiquitination status of substrate proteins. We found that USP19 overexpression can induce tdp-43 cytoplasmic trans-localization. Further USP19 can deubiquitinate TDp-43 in cell model.

Presenters
YY

Yan Yan

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

284 LISPRO, an ionic co-crystal of lithium, mitigates Alzheimer-like pathological changes and associated cognitive-and neuropsychiatric behavioral deficits in transgenic Alzheimer’s mice
Ahsan Habib MS, Darrell Sawmiller, Song Li, Sadia Afrin Munna, David Rongo, Shengnuo Fan, Jun Tian, Huayan Hou, Jin Zeng, Brian Giunta, Adam Smith, Takashi Mori, Glenn Currier, Douglas R Shytle,  and Jun Tan

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized pathologically by the accumulation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain and clinically by a progressive decline in cognitive function. Lithium is used primarily as a mood stabilizer for bipolar disorder and has been used for a long time to treat mania and depression. Furthermore, it has also been shown as preventing cognitive loss which indicated the therapeutic potential of this drug for AD. We hypothesized that an ionic co-crystal of lithium (LISPRO) prevent cognitive decline and associated pathology changes in cell culture and AD mouse models.

Presenters
MA

Md Ahsan Habib, MS

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

285 Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Shijie Song MD, Xiaoyuan Kong MD, Sandra Acosta PhD, Vasyl Sava PhD, Cesar V. Borlongan PhD, and Juan Sanchez-Ramos Phd, MD

Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF) has been reported to enhance recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis) and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by TBI.

Presenters
X

 Xiaoyuan Kong, MD

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

286 Altered Neurogenesis, Social Interaction, and Memory in a Novel Schizophrenia Mouse Model using DISC1 and Reelin Gene Mutations
Heather Mahoney, BFA, MS; Christopher Morris, BS; Bianca Capraro, BS; Amara Yunus, BS; Emily Peterson; Hannah Justin; David Gonzalez; Suraj Nagaraj, BA; April Lussier, PhD; Joshua Gamsby, PhD; Edwin Weeber, PhD; Danielle Gulick, MEd, PhD

This study evaluates behavior and adult neurogenesis in a novel genetic mouse model of schizophrenia in which two genes, Disrupted-in-schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) and Reelin, have been disrupted. We found deficits in neuronal maturation and multiple behaviors. This mouse model will be used to evaluate gene-environment interactions relevant to schizophrenia susceptibility.

Presenters
avatar for Heather Mahoney

Heather Mahoney

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

287 A breath of fresh air for treating traumatic brain injury: Therapeutic effects of single or repeated hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic traumatic brain injury
M. Grant Liska, Melissa Gonzalez, Paul R. Sanberg, Sandra A. Acosta, Cesar V. Borlongan

The present study investigates the potential of delayed hyperbaric oxygen therapy – either a single treatment or repeated treatment – to ameliorate motor, neurological, cognitive, and anxiety alterations in a rat model of chronic traumatic brain injury.

Presenters
MG

Michael G. Liska

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

288 Nanoparticles designed for intranasal delivery of siRNA and DNA to brain
Vasyl Sava, Shijie Song, Xiaoyuan Kong, Parastou Foroutan, Gary Martinez, William Dominguez-Viqueria, Shyam Mohapatra, Subra Mohapatra, Juan Sanchez-Ramos

Development of nanocarrier system for non-invasive delivery to brain of molecules useful for gene therapy.

Presenters
VS

Vasyl Sava, PhD.

Faculty, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

289 Role of Grp94 in steroid-induced glaucoma
Ricardo A. Cordova, MS, Zheying Sun, MS, Niat Gebru, Vincent M. Crowley, Ph. D., Brian S. J. Blagg, Ph. D., Christopher L. Passaglia, Ph. D., Laura J. Blair, Ph. D. , John Koren III, Ph. D.

Study the use of a novel Grp94 inhibitor, 4Br-BnIm, as a potential therapeutic for steroid-induced glaucoma.

Presenters
RC

Ricardo Cordova

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

290 Designing a Model to Explore Tau's Unfolded Protein Response
Roy Blackburn, John Koren III, PhD., Laura Blair, PhD., April Darling

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive disease common in elderly patients that destroys important mental functions including memory largely due to neuronal loss.  It is known that accumulation of the protein tau leads to neuronal loss. However, the method of how tau accumulation leads to neurotoxic pathways is highly unexplored. Recent studies show that tau accumulation leads to increased amounts of ubiquiniated proteins in neurons which triggers the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The unfolded protein response is a response caused by the unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum’s (ER) lumen, and leads to ER stress causing cell death. It is thought that in AD, tau is interfering with quality control of the proteins in the ER.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

291 Altered Neuronal Distribution and Downstream Signaling Associated with a Nonsense Mutation in zDHHC9
Lisa Kirouac PhD, Krishna Reddy PhD, Monic Amin BS, Laura Pendleton MS, Robert Deschenes PhD

zDHHC9 is a protein acyltransferase (PAT) that adds a palmitate to specific protein substrates. Currently there are two known protein substrates of zDHHC9: H-Ras and N-Ras.  In the neuron, there are over 300 potential palmitoylated proteins and it is likely that many of these proteins are post-translationally modified by zDHHC9.  Recently, a zDHHC9 nonsense mutation at Arginine 298 (R298*), resulting in a truncation of the last 67 amino acids of the protein, has been associated with X-Linked Intellectual Disability (XLID). Here, we characterize the R298* zDHHC9 mutant in the context of the mature neuron and examine potential altered downstream signaling associated with this loss-of-function mutation.

Presenters
LN

Lisa N Kirouac, PhD

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

292 Identification and validation of novel substrates of the palmitoyl acyl transferase zDHHC9, a gene associated with X-linked intellectual disability (XLID)
Karisa Serraneau, BS, MS, MD Candidate; Malathi Narayan, PhD; Robert Deschenes, PhD

This study identifies novels substrates of zDHHC9, an enzyme that palmitoylates proteins, and explores the role of this protein modification in X- linked intellectual disability.

Presenters
KS

Karisa S. Serraneau

Med I student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

293 C1 Complement mediates human cord blood serum derived APP α-secretase cleavage activity in vitro
Allen Fan, Catherine Wang, Ahsan Habib, Darrell Sawmiller, Huayan Hou, Manasa Kanithi, Dan Zi, Zhi-Xu He, Paul R. Sanberg and Jun Tan

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. In healthy individual amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved by α-secretase generating sAPPα, which serve neuroprotective functions. However, in the neurodegenerative environment of AD patients, Aß peptides of either 40 or 42 residues are generated by increased beta and gamma secretase activity.  These proteins amalgamate in specific regions of the brains causing impairment and dysfunction characteristic of the disease. Human umbilical cord blood cells have proven useful as potential immunomodulatory therapies in various models of neurodegenerative diseases.  Our most recent work studied the impact of umbilical cord blood serum (CBS) on modulation of sAPPα production. Heat-activated umbilical cord blood serum, (CBS) has significantly promoted sAPPα production indicating presence of heat sensitive α-secretase in CBS.  LC-MS/MS analysis was used to determine the molecular source of a-secretase in purified CBS and AgBS. Of the proteins identified, the subunits of C1 complex (C1q, C1r and C1s) and alpha-2-macroglobulin showed significantly greater levels in aCBSF compared with AgBSF.  Specifically, C1 markedly increased sAPPa  and aCTF production in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas C1q alone only minimally increased and C3 did not increase sAPPa production in the absence of sera.  Furthermore, C1q markedly increased sAPPa and aCTF, while decreasing Ab, in CHO/APPwt cells cultured in the presence of whole sera. These results confirm that APP a-secretase activity in human blood serum is mediated by C1 opening a potential modality of therapeutic for the future of AD.

Presenters
AF

Anran Fan

Post Doc, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

294 Effect of 22kDA and 27kDA heat shock proteins in tau aggregation.
Yamile Vidal Aguiar,M.S., April Darling, Ph.D. student, Vladimir Uversky, Ph.D., John Koren, Ph.D., Laura Blair,Ph.D.

Tau aggregation is a pathological hallmark in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies.  The 22kDa and 27kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp27 and Hsp22) are known to prevent aggregation of unfolded proteins inside the cell. These ATP-independent small heat shock proteins are regulated through phosphorylation. However, the role of phosphorylation on aggregation dynamics and how they regulate tau aggregation is not fully understood.

Presenters
YV

Yamile Vidal Aguiar

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

296 Generation of Dopaminergic Neurons from Human Skin Fibroblasts
Niat Gebru, BS, Yamile Vidal Aguiar, MS, Dali Zheng, PhD, April Darling BS , Zheying Sun MS, Laura J Blair PhD, John Koren III PhD

Dopaminergic neurons, found in the Substantia Nigra, are associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. According to recent publications, somatic cells can be converted to other cell types by the combined expression of distinct transcription factors. This study is based on a published paper that involves the generation of functional dopaminergic neurons from human fibroblasts by the expression of Ascl1, Lmx1a and Nurr1. These induced neuronal cells express proteins specific to dopaminergic neurons and generate action potentials. Conversion of these cells can be vital in understanding neuronal development, Parkinson’s disease modelling, and help develop and screen novel therapeutics for these diseases.

Presenters
NG

Niat Gebru

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

297 Palmitoylated DNAJC5 Recruits Tau to Endosomes and Promotes Tau Release from Cells
Zheying Sun, Master, Dali Zheng, Danilo Polanco, Leia Sullivan, Yan Yan, April Darling, Bryce Nordhues, Jack Webster, Laura Blair, John Koren, Chad Dickey, Robert Deschenes

palmitoylated DNAJC5 can recruit aggregated tau to endosomes and promote tau secretion.

Presenters
ZS

Zheying Sun, MS

Masters student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

298 Role of Minimally Invasive Surgical Techniques in Thoracolumbar Fusion Revision Surgery
Karina Bach, BA, Konrad Bach, MD, Dr. Jacob Januszewski, DO, Dr. Juan Uribe, MD

The aim of the study was to determine radiographic and clinical outcomes and complication rates of minimally invasive revision surgery for patients with index thoracolumbar fusion.

Presenters
KB

Karina Bach, BA

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

299 Casein Kinase 1 Inhibitor Recovers Cognitive Deficits in APPPS1 model of Alzheimer's Disease
A. Portugues MS, S. Nagaraj, A. Yunus, J. Gamsby PhD, D. Gulick PhD

The effect of modification of the biological clock on the behavior of a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease.

Presenters
AP

Alexandra Portugues, M.S.

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

300 WITHDRAWN Creation and characterization of a novel angelman rat model
Andie Dodge, Scott Dindot, David Segal, Edwin Weeber

We have recently created a novel rat model for Angelman syndrome. Here we are demonstrating the behavioral and electrophysiological characterization of this model.

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

301 Modeling Sundowning Syndrome in Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease
Suraj Nagaraj, Amara Yunus, Alexandra Portugues, Heather Mahoney, Danielle Gulick

We use mouse models of aging and Alzheimer’s Disease to examine the role of circadian dysfunction in Sundowning Syndrome as well as examining circadian modulation as a potenital axis of treatment.

Presenters
SN

Suraj Nagaraj

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

303 Circadian Rhythms and Polyamine Biosynthesis
John Faulkner MS, Amara Yunus BS, Joshua Gamsby, PhD., Danielle Gulick, PhD.

Within the polyamine biosynthesis pathway, spermine oxidase (SAT1) plays a crucial role in the catabolism and inter-conversion of polyamines.  In this study, we set out to determine how inducing SAT1 levels affects the circadian rhythm.

Presenters
JM

John M. Faulkner, Jr.

Staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

304 Tau overexpression leads to uncoupling of mTORC1 signaling in neuronal cells
Huimin Liang MS, Chao Ma MS, Andrii Kovalenko BS, Leslie A. Sandusky-Beltran PhD, John Calahatian, Mani Kallupurackal, Miles Nowicki, Emily Lopez, Daniel Lee PhD1

Tau is a microtubule associated protein responsible for stabilizing microtubules in neurons, and remains especially important for neuronal function in the brain. In neurodegenerative disorders, tau often becomes hyperphosphorylated and aggregates to form pathological neurofibrillary tangles(NFTs) inside the neurons and can lead to tauopathies, like Alzheimer’s disease(AD). Tau inclusions remain a central target for drug discovery, however no disease-modifying treatments exist. More recently, signaling involved in mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) has become a dominant pathway to signal amino acid abundance and we recently uncovered a role for arginine sensors in tauopathies. We found increased expression of enzymes that promote arginine production and arginine sensors, as well as several putative mTORC1 activation markers in tau transgenic mice. Our data indicates higher mTORC1 signaling and activity in tau transgenic mice compared to non-transgenic mice. The Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) data showed that total brain arginine level was increased by 35% in tau transgenic mice. Interstitial fluid from in vivo brain microdialysis showed increased basal levels of extracellular arginine and arginine release following neuronal stimulation in tau transgenic mice compared to non-transgenic littermates.

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

305 Nurturing a Healthy Gut Microbiome for Stroke: Stem Cells Gut Their Way to Sequester Stroke Inflammation
Alexander Neifert, Michael Liska, Sandra A. Acosta, Cesar V. Borlongan

The present study evaluates the therapeutic effect of bone marrow stem cells (hBMSC) on the gut-brain axis in stroke pathology, and their potential to ameliorate stroke-associated motor and neurological impairments, inflammation, and aberrant microbiome.

Presenters
AR

Alexander R Neifert

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

306 Targeting Arginine Sensors SLC38A9 and GPRC6A to Alleviate Tauopathies
Chao Ma MS, Andrii Kovalenko BS, John Calahatian, Huimin Liang MS, Mani Kallupurackal, Jerry Hunt BS, Kevin Nash PhD, Margaret Fahnestock PhD, Dave Morgan PhD, Paula Bickford PhD, Daniel Lee PhD

Tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) consist of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases for which no effective treatments exist. We identified unique interaction between the arginine metabolism and tau metabolism. Normal balance of arginine metabolism is critical for regulating cellular proteostasis and has an influence on tau pathology. We have previously demonstrated that overexpression of arginine metabolizing enzymes arginase1(Arg1) and arginine deiminase(ADI) could significantly reduce different tau phenotypes in tau transgenic mouse models. We posit that arginine depletion can reduce tau pathology through amino acid sensing mechanisms. Several seminal findings identified solute carrier family 38A9 (SLC38A9) as the first arginine sensor. The lysosomal amino acid transporter SLC38A9 interacts with the Rag-Ragulator-v-ATPase complex and is required for arginine to activate the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Other key studies revealed that G protein coupled receptor family C, group 6, member A (GPRC6A) binds arginine and may serve as an extracellular arginine sensor.

Presenters
CM

Chao Ma

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

307 Soluble CX3CL1 Rescues Cognitive Deficits in CX3CL1 Knock Out Mice
Meena S. Subbarayan, MS, Aimee N. Winter, PhD, Bethany Grimmig, PhD, Melinda Peters, BS, Edwin J. Weeber, PhD, Kevin Nash, PhD, Paula C. Bickford, PhD

Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is a chemokine expressed predominately by neurons that mediates communication between neurons and microglia. Microglial activity is critical for establishing and refining neural circuits in the both the developing CNS and the adult brain. By regulating microglial activity, CX3CL1 can effectively mitigate the damaging effects of chronic inflammation within the brain, a state that plays a major role in aging. Levels of soluble CX3CL1 decrease with aging, which could lead to enhanced inflammation, and subsequent declines in cognition. Here, we assessed the consequences of treating CX3CL1 knock out mice with soluble fractalkine on the cognitive behavior.

Presenters
MS

Meena Subhashini Subbarayan

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

308 The Role of Hydroxyurea to Prevent Stroke in Sickle Cell Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Carla Hasson, MD Candidate; Lisa Veling, MD Candidate; Juan Rico, MD; Rahul Mhaskar, MPH, PhD

A systematic review investigating hydroxyurea's clinical efficacy to prevent stroke and silent stroke in sickle cell disease patients. We evaluated rates of stroke, silent stroke, toxicity, and mortality in sickle cell disease patients being treated with hydroxyurea, compared to standard treatment with chronic blood transfusions.

Presenters
CH

Carla Hasson

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

309 Quantitative Assessment of the Intracellular Uptake of Chlorotoxin in a U87 Human Glioma Mouse Model for the Targeted Drug Delivery System
Alan Roberts, BS, Joseph O. Johnson, PhD, Aleksandra Karolak, PhD, Norma Alcantar, PhD, Katarzyna A. Rejniak, PhD, Marzenna Wiranowska, MS, PhD

This study quantitatively evaluates the tumor cell targeting capabilities and intracellular uptake pattern of Chlorotoxin when delivered intratumorally and intravenously using subcutaneous U87 human glioblastoma mouse model. CTX is a scorpion derived polypeptide that selectively binds to tumor cells of neuroectodermal origin, such as glioma and a wide range of other tumor cells, but not normal cells. We show the specificity of CTX uptake by U87 human glioma cells in vivo.

Presenters
AR

Alan Roberts

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

310 Advanced nano-formulation for Acetaminophen to overcome toxicity
Rohini Nimbalkar, Vijaykumar Sutariya, Kalyan C. Chapalamadugu, Yashwant Pathak, Todd Daviau, Brain McMillan, Janice Cecace, Srinivas M. Tipparaju
 
In the present study, our objective was to decrease the volume for oral administration of Acetaminophen (APAP) and to overcome its toxicity, by co-administration with anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). The objective is to prepare a combination drug nano-formulaton of APAP+NAC. APAP and NAC were incorporated into Eudragit E100 using Methanol as the solvent. APAP+NAC nano-formulation was prepared according to nano-precipitation method with some modifications. This nano-formulation was characterized using different analytical procedures for getting insights in to APAP+NAC combination drug nano-particles for its dimension and drug-release profile and entrapment efficiency. This novel technique allows us to prepare nano-formulation for the combined therapy of APAP with NAC to overcome hepato-toxicity.

Presenters
RN

Rohini Nimbalkar

Doctoral student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

311 Completed and Attempted Suicide and Self-Inflicted Burn Suicide: A Comparison of Risk Factors
Kristina Rosa Bolling, MPH; Thanh Tran, MPH; Rachel Karlnoski, PhD; Loryn Taylor, ARNP-C; Kimberly Brown-Maynell, ARNP-C; Devon Durham; David Smith Jr., MD

Suicide is a major global public health problem. A recent retrospective analysis of data from our burn unit found that while Minorities accounted for a high percentage of self-inflicted burn suicide admissions in the unit, they were found to have lower reported rates of common risk factors for suicide in comparison to Caucasians. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to validate these finding by evaluating all suicide admissions.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

312 Electronic Health Record Workflow Revisions and Creation of an Online Resource Directory: A Quality Improvement Project for Case Managers
Elizabeth Simoneit BS, Ebony Funches DNPc, APRN, Deborah Lerner MD, Hector Llenderrozos MD

Quality improvement project developing a cloud-based directory for case managers at a Los Angeles federally qualified health clinic network and streamlining their EHR documentation.

Presenters
EP

Elizabeth P Simoneit, BS

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

313 Assessment of Impact of a Skin Cancer Education Session on Cosmetology Students’ Knowledge and Preparedness to Assess Future Clients for Skin Lesions
Anna Radisic, BA; Kelsey Hundley, MS; Nishit Patel, MD; Christopher Nelson Sr., MD; Rahul Mhaskar, PhD, MPH

This study analyzes the role of cosmetology students in skin cancer screening and the development of a skin cancer education curriculum.

Presenters
AR

Anna Radisic, BA

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

314 Evaluating the Impact of Sepsis Educational Interventions on Health Care Providers and Patients Accessing Care at Khon Kaen Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand.
Niraj Gowda MS3,  Leah Canvaser MS3

Sepsis and its associated sequelae rank among the most common causes of death globally. As sepsis is one of the most common reasons for admission of a critically ill patient to an Intensive Care Unit, education of care providers in standard care of sepsis and signs of septic shock can greatly reduce sepsis related morbidity and mortality. In this scope, we employed a quasi-experimental interventional study at Khon Kaen Hospital. The first arm of our study utilized nurses from a variety of different medical departments who participated in a pre-intervention assessment of knowledge, an educational intervention, and a post-intervention assessment of knowledge. The scores before and after the intervention were compared within and between nursing departments at Khon Kaen Hospital. A second arm of our study involved education of visitors of patients at Khon Kaen Hospital about sepsis to spread awareness. A similar style intervention was employed for hospital visitors with a pre-intervention assessment, discussion based educational intervention led by a Thai medical student, and post-intervention assessment. By increasing knowledge regarding sepsis and septic shock, there is potential to increase early identification and therefore reduce sepsis morbidity and mortality.

Presenters
NG

Niraj Gowda

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

315 Cross-sectional Survey of Concern and Attitudes Toward Zika Virus in Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic
Eric Hasenkamp MSIII, Gregory Black MSIII, Nicholas Johnson MSIII, Rosanna Ianiro MD, MPH, CPH, DTM&H, CTropMed, Ricardo Izurieta MD, Dr.PH, MPH, Miguel Reina MD, MPH, PhD

This survey was performed in order to assess the population of Jarabacoa, Dominican Republic regarding their knowledge, level of concern, and prevention practices of the Zika virus. In addition, questions about reproductive health were asked in order to determine if and how they protect themselves from sexual spread of the virus.

Presenters
EH

Eric Hasenkamp

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

316 An Interdisciplinary Approach to Service Learning: a Description of Tampa Bay Street Medicine and the College of Public Health’s Partnership
Attiya Harit MS, LesleAnn Hayward BS, Katherine Allen BS , Virginia Lidell BS, Anna Armstrong PhD,  MPH

This poster aims to describe the partnership between Tampa Bay Street Medicine, a Morsani College of Medicine student-led organization focused on providing basic medical care to the local houseless community, and the University of South Florida’s College of Public Health. Medical students along with undergraduate and graduate level College of Public Health students are engaged in an interdisciplinary approach to service-learning and to the creation of a medical needs assessment to evaluate Tampa Bay Street Medicine’s services for the unsheltered population of the Tampa Bay area.

Presenters
AH

Attiya Harit

Med II student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

317 Mobile App Development and Usability Research to Improve Patient-centered Effective Ccommunication
Abena Annor, M.S; Samia Ozorio Dutra, MSN; Marlene Joannie Bewa, M.D; John Clochesy, PhD; Deborah Cragun, PhD, MS, CGC; Danielle Gorman; Stephanie Castillo

An interdisciplinary team is going to develop a mobile app that aims at improving patient-provider communication by identifying and evaluating key attributes of patient-centered care then providing feedback to patient and provider on how to improve communication.

Presenters
AA

Abena Annor, MS

Med I student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

318 The Development of an Electronic Medical Record For the Academic Clinician and a Solution for the Competing Electronic Medical Record System
Morgan Cribbin, Eric Reintgen, Lauren Kerivan, Michael Reintgen, Jeff King, Steve Shivers, PhD, Charles Cox, MD, Douglas Reintgen, MD

An electronic database was developed for clinical mamagement as an EMR and a resource to perform clinical research.

Presenters
MC

Morgan Cribbin

staff, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

319 Bacillus cereus in the Hematologic Malignancy Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature
James D. Denham, MS, Sowmya Nanjappa, MBBS MD, John N. Greene, MD

Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive rod that is now recognized as a rare cause of frank disease in the neutropenic hematologic malignancy patient. In this report, we describe a case of typhlitis caused by B. cereus and we summarize the available English language literature to draw tentative conclusions regarding the clinical manifestations of this organism.

Presenters
JJ

James James Denham, MS

Med III student, Morsani College of Medicine


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

320 Identifying key LOCI associated with Glioblastoma Multiforme
Onyekachi Nwogu, Jordan Creed, Kathleen Egan,Travis Gerke

This projects utilizes intergrative genomic and computaional techniques to identify key loci's associated with Glioblastoma Multiforme and its corresponding effect on gene expression. Thereby providing useful insight on the functional roles of genes associated with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

Presenters
ON

Onyekachi Nwogu Nwogu

Staff, Moffitt Cancer Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

321 Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Myelodysplasia-Related Changes with or without Prior Myelodysplastic Syndrome Show Distinct Gene Mutation Profile.”
Mary-Margaret Allen, MD; Mohammed Hussaini, MD; Eric Padron, MD; Hailing Zhang, MD; Xiaohui Zhang, MD, PhD; Lynn Moscinski, MD; Ling Zhang, MD; Jinming Song, MD, PhD

Acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplastic-related changes can occur with a prior history of a myelodysplastic syndrome or can occur de novo. We looked at the NGS profiles for the two entities to compare and see if they are biologically distint entities. Our data shows that there are more mutations demonstrated in the patients with a prior history and more of the cases with a prior history had mutations in SRSF2, U2AF1, TET2, ASXL1, RUNX1 and SETBP1, suggesting that they are in fact distinct subsets of AML-MRC.

Presenters
MA

Mary-Margaret Allen, MD

Fellow, Moffitt Cancer Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

322 Comparison of Margin and Re-excision Rates Following Radar Reflector Localization to Wire Localization in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer
Danielle Henry, MD; Adel Yazdankhah MD; Weihong Sun, MD; Biwei Cao, MS; Brian Czerniecki, MD, PhD; Nazanin Khakpour, MD

A single institution retrospective IRB approved study of all lumpectomies performed by six surgeons for invasive breast cancer to evaluate the margin status and re-excision rates between a new technology, radar reflector localization (RRL) and the conventional wire localization (WL).

Presenters
DH

Danielle Henry, MD

Fellow, Moffitt Cancer Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

323 Ancestry Informative eQTLs
Jordan Creed, MPH, Anders Berglund, PhD, Kosj Yamoah, MD, PhD, Travis Gerke, ScD

Divergent eQTLs in prostate tumor tissue between African American and European American men.

Presenters
JH

Jordan Hunter Creed, MPH

Staff, Moffitt Cancer Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

324 Gratitude and Health Related Behaviors: An Unexamined Area in Heart Failure Self-Care
Lakeshia Cousin, MS, RN, Harleah Buck, PhD, RN, FPCN, FAAN, Laura Redwine, PhD

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among trait gratitude, medication adherence, sleep quality, and self-efficacy, in patients with heart failure. Self-care among heart failure (HF) patients can be a labor-intensive process and inadequate self-care can result in HF disease progression. Gratitude, the practice of appreciating the positive aspects of life has been linked with better health behaviors. However, little is known about the relationship among trait gratitude, health behaviors and self-efficacy to prevent disease exacerbation in patients with stage B HF. Developing an intervention to boost gratitude may increase health-related behaviors that could potentially slow HF disease progression.

Presenters
avatar for Lakeshia Cousin, MS, ARNP-BC

Lakeshia Cousin, MS, ARNP-BC

Doctoral student, College of Nursing
Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner and McKnight PhD Fellow. Research interests include the Science of Gratitude and its impact on Cardiovascular Health.


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

325 Puerto Rico Disaster Relief: A Community Health Assessment 45 Days Post Hurricane Maria
Jessica M Gordon, PhD, ARNP, Deidre Orriola, MPH, CPH, CLC, Federico Gordon, MBA, MLS (ASCP)CM, Mary Unangst, IBCLC, Yazmin E Rodriguez Vellon, MD

On September 20, 2017, hurricane Maria caused unimaginable destruction and mass flooding that wiped out the public health infastructure of Puerto Rico putting nearly 3 million people at risk. Many families lost everything, homes were destroyed, medical care was severed and much of the island is in the process of being rebuilt. In response to these post disaster conditions the mobilization of medical disaster relief efforts were organized by an interdisciplinary response team to perform immediate access to health care 45 days post hurricane Maria. Medical aid was provided to nearly three hundred (N=296) residents between the ages of 2 months to 102 years of age. Community health assessment observations and experiences were discussed daily during response team debriefings post pop-up clinic and home visitations. All observational data and debriefing notes were collected and documented in the response team daily diary. Recurrent themes were itemized in two domains with specific subdomains associated with community medical and public health items. Results of the community health assessment identified the exacerbation of underlying conditions like reactive airway disases, diabetes, hypertension and depression associated with post disaster triggers such as limited access to health care, treatments, potable water, nutritious foods, telephone communication, warm water for bathing or muscle strain, or air conditioning to prevent dehydration, heat exhaustion and humidity. External triggers included damaged homes with continuous roof leakage, generator noise that triggered sleep distrubance, mold, and unemployment.

Presenters
avatar for Deidre Orriola

Deidre Orriola

Faculty, University of South Florida
Deidre graduated from the University of South Florida (USF) in 2006 with her master's degree in Public Health. Her faculty position at USF began in 2010 in the College of Public Health. When she’s not in the classroom in Tampa, Deidre teaches study abroad courses in Panama, England... Read More →


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

326 Factors Associated with School Readiness in Infants Born Prematurely
David Rubio, Jr., M.A., Kristin Edwards, M.S., Samia Dutra, M.S., Jessica Gordon, Ph.D., Kathleen Armstrong, Ph.D., Maureen Groer, Ph.D.

This study examined neurodevelopmental outcomes associated with school readiness in existing cohorts of children at 4-6 years of age who were born prematurely.  The children were administered assessments of intelligence, motor developmental, and basic school concepts.  Child and family factors (e.g., race/ethnicity, SES, gestational age) were also collected.  This study examined the child and family factors associated with higher levels of school readiness in the cohort of children.

Presenters
DR

David Rubio, Jr.

Doctoral student, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

327 Maternal High Risk Behaviors in Chitre, Panama
Denise J. Maguire, PhD, RN, CNL, FAAN, Ivonne Hernandez, PhD, RN, IBCLC, Constance Visovsky, PhD, ACNP-BC, FAAN, Andrea Huerta, RN, BS

This is a cross sectional study of lactating women with infants less than one year old to describe their breastfeeding practices and substance use.

Presenters
DJ

Denise J. Maguire, PhD, RN, FAAN

Faculty, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

328 Creating Global Nurses; a qualitative analysis of a US College of Nursing education abroad program
Stephen McGhee Msc, Dr Connie Visovsky, Phd, APRN, RN, Dr Rebecca Lutz, DNP, APRN, RN, Dr Elizabeth Jordan, DNSc, RN, Alexa Pridemore, BSN, RN, Kailey Taylor, BSN, RN

The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (AACN, 2008) guides Registered Nurse (RN) education in the U.S. This document recommends international experiential learning as a basis for understanding diversity, cultural differences, and healthcare policies and delivery systems (Maltby, deVries-Erich & Lund, 2016).  The goal of international immersive experiences include the development of cultural competence and the associated impact on global health (Kulbok, Mitchell, Glick & Greiner, 2012; Burgess, Reimer-Kirkham, & Astle, 2014).

Presenters
SM

Stephen McGhee, Msc, Lt Col

Faculty, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

329 WITHDRAWN Measuring Effects of Political Astuteness Among Attendees of the 2018 American Association of Nurse Practitioners’ Health Policy Conference
Crystal C. Williams, BSN, BSN - DNP Student

Increasing political engagement is vital for the advancement of the nursing profession. The goal of this project is to measure how attendance at the 2018 American Association of Nurse Practitioners' Health Policy Conference and face-to-face meetings with U.S. Federal Congressional Representatives have on attendees' perceptions of their political astuteness.

Presenters
CC

Crystal C. Williams, DNP

Doctoral student, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

330 Mindful Eating and Weight Loss: A Systematic Review of Literature
Carissa Alinat, PhDc, MSN, BA, ARNP, Cecile A. Lengacher, PhD, RN, FAAN, Carmen Rodriguez

The purpose of this review is to explore and summarize current evidence surrounding mindful eating and its effects on weight loss and overweight or obese-related co-morbidities.

Presenters
CA

Carissa Alinat

Doctoral student, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

331 Complicated Grief Associated with Caregiving
Tina M. Mason, MSN, ARNP, AOCN, AOCNS

Complicated grief (CG) is the term used to describe intense and prolonged bereavement that interferes with normal activities accompanied by destructive thoughts and behaviors. A systematic search for articles published between 2003 and 2017 on the topic of complicated grief associated with caregiving was performed using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and PsychINFO. Search terms included caregiver, health outcomes, CG, and their variants

Presenters
TM

Tina M. Mason, MSN, ARNP, AOCN, AOCNS

Doctoral student, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

333 Correlations among toddler gut microbiome and later health status variables.
Samia Dutra, MSN, Maureen Wimberly Groer, PhD, Ming Ji, PhD, Larry Dishaw, Phd, Elizabeth Miller, PhD, Allyson Duffy, PhD, Kathleen Armstrong, PhD, Alyson Yee

Jack Gilbert, PhD Establishment and succession of the human microbiome begins at birth and microbial composition adapts alongside human development and growth. Development of a healthy signature microbial community has significant effects on health.This study followed 18 very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, measured initially in the from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), at the age of two to three years old.

Presenters
SV

Samia VO Dutra

Doctoral student, College of Nursing


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

334 Events of hyperoxia induced cardiac remodeling varies with length of exposure
Jennifer Leigh Rodgers Ph.D., Siva Kumar Panguluri Ph.D.

Supplemental 100% oxygen with mechanical ventilation is a standard of care in intensive care units (ICUs). However, this treatment has also been associated with poor outcomes in patients, and increased mortality rates. Our lab utilizes a mouse model in order to study the pathophsyiology of cardiac remodeling in mice due to hyperoxia treatment. This study delineates molecular insights of cardiac remodeling in our clinically relevant mouse model.

Presenters
JL

Jennifer L Rodgers, PhD

Post Doc, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

335 Kv beta subunit regulates cardiac levels of SLC41 a magnesium transporter.
Jared Tur Ph.D., Kalyan, C. Chapalamadugu Ph.D., Srinivas M. Tipparaju Ph.D.

Investigating the role of the Kv Beta subunit and its regulation of SLC41 a novel magnesium transport protein within the heart.

Presenters
JT

Jared Tur, Ph.D.

Post Doc, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

336 WITHDRAWN Ventricular repolarization abnormalities in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus
Wesley Hamlin B.S., Timothy Padawer M.S., Srinivas Tipparaju Pharm.D., Aarti Patel M.D. 
Nidhi Patel M.D.

This is a retrospective chart review assessing cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with type II diabetes with and without obstructive coronary artery disease.

Presenters
WZ

Wesley Zane Hamlin, B.S.

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

337 Gram Negative Rod Breast Wound Infections following Post-Cancer Reconstructive Surgery
Donna Mae Pate, B.S., Dr. John Greene, Clarissa Maravilla, Shelby Power, Nichole Guidish

Patients with breast cancer may be at an increased risk for infection due to their immunosuppression. Anywhere from 2-24% of breast cancer patients suffer from infections caused by microorganisms, usually diagnosed following expander related reconstructive surgery. Tissue expander surgeries may develop complications that can often result in extending antibiotic treatment, increasing the rate of drug related complications, and removal of the implant. Deep wounds in immunocompromised patients are primarily caused by gram-negative bacteria. Evaluating the most common bacterial infections due to gram negative etiology, and identifying their susceptibilities may allow clinicians to prevent infections in cancer patients who have received breast reconstructive surgery.

Presenters
DM

Donna Mae Marg Pate

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

338 TDP43 and the neurovascular unit
Frank Zamudio, B.A., Shayna Smeltzer, M.S., Nicholas Stewart, Zainuddin Quadri, Ph.D.

Maj-Linda Selenica, Ph.D. This study explores the role of TDP43 in corticospinal neurons of the mouse cortex and during systemic inflammation. Our data support TDP43's neurotoxic effects while also revealing diverse microglial activation and peripheral cell infiltration. Surprisingly, systemic inflammation had an effect on TDP43 AAV mice, but not wild-type mice, also suggesting blood-brain barrier damage. We hypothesize that TDP43 signaling affects the neurovascular unit, leading to BBB permeability, peripheral cell infiltration, and changes in synaptic plasticity. We also expect to further explore the role of systemic inflammation in these processes.

Presenters
SS

Sheba Saji, M.S.

Staff; MPH student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

339 Neurotrophin-5 is involved in the regulation of Alzheimer disease
Zainuddin Quadri, PhD, Sheba Sazi, Benjamin Cooper, Frank Zamudio

Maj-Linda B. Selenica, PhD Impairment of synaptic transmission is common in old age including Alzheimer disease. Tau protein helps to stablizes neurons disintegrates and truncated into shorter form known as C3-Tau. We found in our animal model that mice injected with C3-tau have impairment in long term potential and downregulation of few genes related to LTP. Neuritrohin-5 helps to maintane mature and release synaptic vesicle is one of the gene we found to be downregulate in our C3-tau injected mice.

Presenters
ZQ

Zainuddin Quadri, PhD

Post Doc, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

340 Hexachlorophene reduces pTau in multiple Tau expressing AD cellular models
Vetriselvan Manavalan, Andrew Rosenblum, Mayank Kesarwani, Benjamin Olson, Taylor Weber-Utpadel, Chao Ma, Daniel Lee, and Umesh Jinwal

Aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau (pTau) is one of the major pathological signs of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and many other neurodegenerative diseases. Tau related diseases are also termed as taopathies. Currently, a few pharmacological interventions are available for these diseases. Here, we are reporting a novel pTau reducing FDA approved drug molecule Hexachlorophene. We used multiple cellular AD models, Human neuroblastoma M17 cell line, HeLaC3 tau overexpressing cell line, HEK280 mutant tau expressing cell line, and mouse N2a Neuro2a tau-GFP expressing cell line to characterize and confirm the effects of Hexachlorophene on pTau.  Western blot, Thioflavin-S staining, and Immunofluorescence techniques were used to analyze Hexachlorophene’s effect on tau. 24 hours’ treatment of Hexachlorophene showed reduction in pTau in a dose dependent manner in M17, HeLaC3, HEK280, and N2a AD cellular models. Furthermore, Thioflavin-S staining and Immunofluorescence show reduction in tau upon Hexachlorophene treatment. Overall, our results using cellular models clearly indicate Hexachlorophene as a promising drug for AD and tauopathies treatment.

Presenters
VM

Vetriselvan Manavalan

Post Doc, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

341 mTOR Signaling and Arginine Sensing by CASTOR1 in Tauopathies.
Andrii Kovalenko BS, Chao Ma MS, Leslie A. Sandusky-Beltran PhD, John Calahatian, Huimin Liang MS, Mani Kallupurackal, Jerry Hunt BS, Kevin Nash PhD, Margaret Fahnestock PhD, Dave Morgan PhD, Paula Bickford PhD, Daniel Lee PhD.

By the middle of the 21st century, 8 billion Americans will be affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the most prevalent among the neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. In tauopathies, hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of microtubule-stabilizing protein tau (MAPT) was shown to promote neuronal loss and brain atrophy. Although the research on tau has been conducted for more than a hundred years, the cause and the mechanism of tau pathology was not discovered. Available medical treatments are not capable of reversing the pathology and clearing the neurofibrillary tangles formed by aggregated tau. Barely slowing the progression of the disease and helping patients to cope with the disease and accepting the universally fatal outcome is the best we can do up to date.mTOR pathway is a master regulator of cellular metabolic state. Its inhibition leads to an increase in autophagy (catabolic state) and increased longevity associated with it, as shown in animal models. Thus it's thought to be one of the key modulators of aging and diseases like Alzheimer's for which age is a primary predictor. The great power of the mTOR pathway means that it has to be very tightly regulated. Nutrient availability is its potent regulator. Our research focuses on the availability of arginine, and it's role in the regulation of the mTOR pathway through interaction with CASTOR, a cytosolic nutrient sensor that controls the activation of the mTORC1 complex.

Presenters
AK

Andrii Kovalenko

Staff, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

342 Polyamine dysregulation precipitates neuropathology to support disease progression in an animal model of tauopathy
Leslie A. Sandusky-Beltran PhD, Andrii Kovalenko BS, Mallory D. Watler BS, Leenil Noel BS, Jerry B. Hunt, Jr. BS, Devon S. Placides PharmD, Sarah N. Fontaine PhD, Margaret Fahnestock PhD, Maj-Linda B. Selenica PhD, Kevin R. Nash PhD, Marcia N. Gordon PhD, Dave G. Morgan PhD, Daniel C. Lee PhD

Tau stabilizes microtubules; however, in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and tauopathies, tau becomes hyperphosphorylated, aggregates, and results in neuronal death. Our group recently uncovered a unique interaction between polyamines and tau fate. Polyamines exert an array of physiological effects that support neuronal function and cognitive processing. Specific stimuli can elicit a polyamine stress response (PSR), resulting in altered central polyamine homeostasis. Evidence suggests that elevations in polyamines following a short-term stressor are beneficial; however, persistent stress and subsequent PSR activation may lead to maladaptive polyamine dysregulation, which occurs in numerous disease states, and may contribute to neuropathology and cognitive impairment in AD.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

343 Neurotrophin-5 is involved in the regulation of Alzheimer's disease
Zainuddin Quadri, Ph.D.,Sheba Saji, M.S., Benjamin Cooper, B.S., Frank Zamudio, B.S.,Maj-Linda B. Selenica, Ph.D

Impairment of synpatic transmission is common in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Tau proteins allow for the stabilization of neurons, and to disintegrate and truncate into shorter forms, referred to as C3-Tau. The animal models in our lab shows that the mice injected with C3-Tau are impaired, and a few genes related to LTP are downregulated. Neurotrophin-5 helps to maintain maturity and releases synpatic vesicles, and is one of the genes that we have identified that would be downregulated in the C3-Tau injected mice.

Presenters
ZQ

Zainuddin Quadri, PhD

Post Doc, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

344 Leading Educational Approaches in Pharmacogenomics (LEAP)
Celeste Small, B.S., Bionqua Lynch, B.S., Shantel Houston, B.S., Lamija Zimic, A.A.

Currently, limited data exists to describe how pharmacogenomic concepts can be introduced into secondary education.The purpose of this study is to determine if our teaching methods are effective in educating high school students about pharmacogenomics. Additionally, we aimed to produce data that could help schools determine when pharmacogenoic concepts could be implemented into secondary education.

Presenters
CS

Celeste Small

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

345 Motivation and its Effect on Positive Nutrition and Exercise Changes in Patients with a BMI Greater than 25 kg/m2
Kristina Dogoda B.S, Amanda Elchynski B.S, Courtney Cantrell B.S

Basic health and nutritional information as well as motivational tips were sent to participants on either a weekly basis over a period of three months or all at once to determine whether there was a correlation between type of motivation and weight loss. Participants were given a survey at the beginning and end of the study that assessed basic demographic information, current weight, medications, and health conditions. The survey also included several assessment questions in order to determine baseline knowledge and  if there was a gain in knowledge at the conclusion of the study.

Presenters
KM

Kristina M Dogoda, B.S

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

346 Identifying Asthma-related Health Disparaties Among Children in Hillsborough County
Kyle M. Guerrero, BS, Kristal Urena, BS, Angela S. Garcia, PharmD, MPH, CPh, Radha V. Patel, PharmD, MPH, BCACP, CPh, Daniel Forrister, PharmD, MPH

Our project was to identify a geographic area demonstrating need for asthma interventions. By identifying different factors such as air quality, prevalence, asthma related hospitalizations and emergency department visits, we created a tool to identify and prioritize areas that could benefit from interventions like patient education and certification as an Asthma-Friendly School.

Presenters
KM

Kyle M. Guerrero, BS

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

347 WITHDRAWN What is the impact of pharmacist care and telemonitoring on health care utilization and Medicare Quality Measure (The Star Ratings)?
Sharon Baby, B.S., Mindy Huynh, B.S., Kevin B. Sneed, Pharm.D., William N. Kelly, Pharm.D

This proof-of-use, one-year, pilot study will evaluate the impact of enhanced pharmacist care and home telemonitoring on health care utilization and Medicare quality measures. This is a randomized cluster controlled trial (RCT) with three clusters (30 patients/cluster). Patients in the study group cluster will receive enhanced pharmacy care and home telemonitoring services managed by a clinical pharmacist for eight months. The clinical pharmacist will use an enhanced collaborative practice agreement and a clinical monitoring dashboard driven by a virtual integrated patient record. One control group will receive usual clinical pharmacist care and no home telemonitoring, while the other control group will receive neither of these interventions (a virtual control group). Each patient will be studied for eight months. The follow up period for the outcomes of interest will be two months.

Presenters
SR

Sharon R Baby, B.S.

Doctoral student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

348 Humanin nanoparticles for reducing pathological factors characteristic of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)
Aum Solanki, Rudy Smalling, Yashwant Pathak, Vijaykumar Sutariya

This project assesses the efficacy of the neuronal peptide, humanin, in treating the inflammatory pathology that is characteristic of age-related macular degeneration. We have prepared and characterized humanin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles, and have tested their treatment efficacy in vitro using an animal retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cell line.

Presenters
AS

Aum Solanki

Med I student, College of Pharmacy


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

349 University of South Florida Student Perceptions of Zika Transmission and the Associated Risks
Julianna Jones, BS; James Muncy, BS; Karthik Subramaniam Thiagarajan, MBBS; Jaime Corvin, Ph.D., MSPH, CPH

This study aimed to determine the knowledge and perceptions of University of South Florida students regarding Zika transmission and the associated risks; additionally, this study aimed to identify any differences in knowledge and perceptions among international students, graduate students, and students that have traveled internationally during the past year.

Presenters
JJ

Julianna Jones

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

350 Longevity of Antibody and Memory B Cell Responses to Polymorphic Haplotypes of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein in Low Malaria Transmission Area of Thailand
Siriruk Changrob, MS; Amy M. McHenry, Ph.D; Myat Htut Nyunt, MD. Ph.D; Jetsumon Sattabongkot, Ph.D; Eun-Taek Han, Ph.D; John H. Adams, Ph.D; Patchanee Chootong, Ph.D

A major challenge in designing a protective vaccine against blood-stage malaria based on the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (DBP) ligand domain (DBL) and most other vaccine candidates is variation in residues of epitopes targeted by inhibitory antibodies. The polymorphic patterns of DBP vary geographically and in Thailand, there are 12 DBP haplotypes (DBL-TH1, DBL-TH2, etc…). In this study, longevity of antibody and memory B cell response (MBCs) of polymorphic DBL-TH haplotypes were analyzed compared to DBP reference Sal1 in P. vivax-exposed individuals living in a malaria-endemic area in southern Thailand.

Presenters
avatar for Siriruk Changrob

Siriruk Changrob

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

351 Are Sexual Minority Men at Higher Risk of Hypertension? Evidence from a Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis
Ian C. Tfirn, BS, Dr. Humberto Lopez Castillo, MD PHD, Evan Hegarty, BS

Increasingly more studies report a higher prevalence of hypertension sexual minority men (SMM). We aim to determine the overall prevalence, the mean differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) and the odds ratios (OR) of lifetime hypertension history (LHH) among SMM, using men who have sex with women (MSW) as the reference group.

Presenters
IT

Ian Tfirn, BS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

352 Use of Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) from Oral Gargles as a Potential Biomarker for the Early Detection of Oropharyngeal Cancer
Linh M. Duong, MPH, MS, Laura Martin-Gomez, MD, PhD, Richard R. Reich, PhD, Hung N. Luu, MD, MPH, PhD, Anna R. Giuliano, PhD

Incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing, particularly in men, mainly due to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. OPSCC detected at an early stage has better treatment response and overall survival. However, to date, no screening method is available for OPSCC. Previous studies have shown that secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), an innate system protein, is present abundantly in saliva and inversely associated with HPV DNA, suggesting that high concentrations of SLPI could be protective from oral HPV infection.

Presenters
LM

Linh M. Duong, MPH, MS

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

353 Exploring oral health literacy among college students
Stacey B. Griner, MPH, CPH, RDH; Cheryl A. Vamos, PhD, MPH; Amelia Phillips, MPH; Erika L. Thompson, PhD, MPH; Joe Puccio, MD; Kay Perrin, PhD, MPH; & Ellen M. Daley, PhD, MPH

Oral health literacy is the ability to find, understand, judge, and decide how to use oral health information. The purpose of this study was to understand oral health literacy among college students. Most participants found it easy to find, understand, judge, and decide about information regarding oral health, but difficulty was noted regarding oral cancers. One third of participants found it difficult to find information about preventing oral cancers, 30% found it difficult to understand the ways to prevent oral cancers, 41% found it difficult to judge their risk for oral cancers, and 37% found it difficult to decide when they should have an oral cancer check-up. Oral cancers are complex and increasing in incidence among young adult populations, and these findings suggested the need for an interdisciplinary approach to improve patient-centered communication of the risks for these cancers.

Presenters
avatar for Stacey Griner

Stacey Griner

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

354 An Association between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Bullying Behaviors among Adolescents in the United States: Results from 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH).
Mosadoluwa N. Afolabi, BScPH  Mary Hill, BS  Abraham A. Salinas-Miranda, MD, MPH, PhD.  Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), are stressors that are experienced during the childhood ages. This cross sectional study examined if adolescents who were exposed to ACEs were more likely to exhibit one form of bullying behaviors. We used nationally representative observations from the 2016 National Survey of children’s health (NSCH). We observed that adolescents with a higher number of ACEs exposure are more likely to show one form of bullying behavior. The findings of these study are important, as early identification of children that have been exposed to ACEs may result in active prevention of bullying behaviors.

Presenters
MN

Mosadoluwa N. Afolabi, BScPH.

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

355 Navigating Parenthood: Examining the Impact of a Parenting Program on Self-Reported Stress
Renee Wallace B.S., Cheyenne Wagi B.A., B.S., Evan Hegarty B.S.

Using pre and post tests of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale, experiences of stress among mothers completing the Triple P intervention will be used to examine the ability of the program to improve self reported stress among participants.

Presenters
RE

Renee E. Wallace, B.S.

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

356 Evaluation of the Hypertension in Pregnancy (HIP) Initiative offered by the Florida Perinatal Quality Collaborative (FPQC)
Onovughe Aroriode, MD, William M. Sappenfield, MD, MPH, CPH, Linda A. Detman, PhD

The Florida Perinatal Collaborative (FPQC) launched the "Hypertension in Pregnancy" initiative in 2015 with 33 hospitals. The initiative's goal was to reduce morbidity and mortality related to hypertension in pregnancy. This evaluation assessed the initiative's effectiveness in facilitating the hospitals' efforts to address hypertension in pregnancy. Hospitals reported that HIP participation led to improvements in their ability to manage hypertension in pregnancy. Facilities implementing standard management protocols increased from 66.7% to 96.2% and treatment within an hour improved from a hospital median of 20% to 90%. Studies to assess whether improvements reduced associated morbidity and mortality are underway.

Presenters
OA

Onovughe Aroriode, MD

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

357 Women's and Men's Perspectives on Contraception: Results from a Qualitative Study
Oluwatosin Ajisope, MBBS, Takudzwa Sayi, PhD, MA, MPhil, Esther Jean-Baptiste, MPH, CPH, Adriana Campos, MPH, CPH, Ngozi Agu, MBBS, MPH, CPH, Vanessa Sharon, Lisa Colen, MHA, Jessica Reynolds, Sara Bricklemyer, and Jennifer Marshall, PhD, CPH

Contraceptive methods, particularly LARC, are highly effective at reducing unintended pregnancies. However, these methods are underutilized in the United States. This study provides insights into perspectives on contraceptive use elicited through focus group discussions with highly diverse groups of men and women from a variety of community agencies and settings. The session sheds light on: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs impacting contraceptive decision making; experiences with contraceptives, including LARC; health care providers’ role in the decision making process; and recommendations to tackle fallacies and increase consistent and correct contraceptives use.

Presenters
OA

Oluwatosin Ajisope, MBBS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

358 Exploration of Factors Associated with Perceptions of Community Safety among Youth in Hillsborough County, Florida: The Research Plan for a Convergent Mixed-methods Study
Yingwei Yang, MS; Karen Liller, PhD; Martha Coulter, DrPH, MSW

Youth perceived safety is not only linked to crime and violence in the neighborhood, but also with health risk behaviors and certain neighborhood characteristics. Although some individual and community factors have been identified (e.g. selling of drugs, depression, poor neighborhood environment), no single factor fully explains youth perceived safety. To better understand the risk factors associated with youth perceived safety, a study aiming to explore the multiple factors and their interrelationships will be conducted.

Presenters
YY

Yingwei Yang

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

359 Perceptions on Reproductive Health and Stress among College Women
Cheyenne R. Wagi, B.A., B.S.; Anneliese Long, A.A.; Emily Holbrook, B.A.; Whitney Fung, M.S.; Laura Kihlstrom, M.S.; David Himmelgreen, PhD

This study aims to improve the understanding of perceptions of reproductive health among college-aged women. The findings of this study may help inform future prenatal interventions.

Presenters
CR

Cheyenne Rae Wagi, B.A., B.S.

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

360 Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Senior’s
Jamie McGrogan, BS; Oliver Massey, Ph.D.

This program evaluation was designed to explore senior’s perspectives of an evidence-based self-management program. The qualitative study analyzed participants’ knowledge and perceptions of the program in order to identify their level of interest in a Diabetes Self-Management Nutrition Therapy (DSMNT). The research collected data from participant completers in Chronic Disease Self-Management Programs (CDSMP). Fifteen program participants were randomly selected to participate. Out of the fifteen selected five agreed to participate. Findings include 3 broad issues and 9 specific themes. Findings suggest participants that were diabetics or borderline diabetics expressed interest in DSMNT and non-diabetics did not.

Presenters
JM

Jamie McGrogan

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

361 Parent Perceptions of Healthy Meals and Mealtime Routines in West/Central Florida: An Exploratory Study
Joanna Farrer Mackie, MPP, Jamie B. McGrogan, BS, Menkeoma Laura Okoli, MBBS, Dinorah Martinez Tyson, Ph.D, MPH, MA

This qualitative study explored parents’ beliefs and practices around mealtime routines. Our research question was: How do parents’ perceptions about healthy foods relate to family mealtime routines? Eight respondents were purposively selected for in-depth, open-ended interviews. Phone interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. First, ‘a priori’ themes were derived from the literature. Then, a grounded theory approach was used to code concepts that emerged from interviews. Findings demonstrate gaps between what participants want and what they experience. Parents have common knowledge of healthy meals, but they experience numerous barriers. Supporting family engagement at mealtimes can promote lifelong healthy eating habits.

Presenters
JF

Joanna Farrer Mackie, MPP

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

362 Association Between Children’s Autism Status, Severity and Maternal Mental or Emotional Health?
Marlene J. Bewa, M.D, Takudzwa Sayi, PhD, MA, MPhil, Russell S. Kirby, PhD, MS, FACE

This research aims at assessing the relationship and strength of association between children’s autism status, severity and maternal mental and emotional health (MME) as well as protective and risk factors of adverse maternal mental or emotional health (MME) using the National Survey of Children Health (NCHS 2016).

Presenters
avatar for Marlene Joannie. Bewa, MD

Marlene Joannie. Bewa, MD

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

363 Where are They Hiding? A Review of State Breastfeeding Friendly Childcare Designation Programs
Regina Maria Roig-Romero, MPH, Ellen Schafer, PhD, Alexis Barr, MS, Stephanie L. Marhefka, PhD

Employment is a known barrier to breastfeeding, due in part to inadequate knowledge and support among childcare providers. Action 16 of the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding (2011) calls on childcare providers to accommodate the needs of breastfeeding families; in response, some states have implemented breastfeeding-friendly childcare (BFFCC) designation programs. In this study, we conducted a systematic investigation to identify such programs.

Presenters
RM

Regina Maria Roig-Romero, MPH, MCHES, IBCLC

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

364 Florida Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Impact Project: Evaluation Strategies for Place-based Initiatives to Improve Child Development
Jennifer Delva, BS, Carlos Parra, BS, Marshara Fross, BS, Anne Bjoerke, BA, Rema Ramakrishnan, PhD, Destiny Singleton, BA, Esther Jean-Baptiste, MPH, Elba Campos, MPH, Dr. Takudzwa Sayi, PhD, Dr. Jennifer Marshall, PhD, MPH, CPH

The Florida Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Impact Project aims to improve early childhood comprehensive systems and the developmental health of children ages 0 through 3 in two place-based community initiatives, the Miami Children’s Initiative and Jacksonville’s New Town Success Zone, through collaborative efforts of community stakeholders by 2021. The evaluation methods of the Impact Project consists of conducting community needs assessments, focus groups, walking/windshield tours of existing place-based initiatives, and social network analysis to identify practices, strengths, and challenges in community partnerships to promote age-appropriate development.

Presenters
JD

Jennifer Delva

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

365 Child, maternal, and household factors associated with early childhood malnutrition in Nigeria
Ngozichukwuka Agu, MBBS, MPH; Nnadozie Emechebe, BPharm, MPH; Korede Adegoke, MBBS, MPH, PhD; Oluyemisi Falope, MBBS, MPH; Russell Kirby, PhD, MS

This study examined factors that were associated with earl child undernutrition in Nigeria. Specifically the relationship between maternal autonomy and indices of child undernutrition - stunting, wasting, and underweight were examined.

Presenters
NA

Ngozichukwuka Agu, MBBS, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

366 Baby's Best Sleep: Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting Evaluation
Marshara Fross, BS, Amanda McMahon, MPH, CPH, Vasthi Ciceron, MPH, CPH, Elba Campos, MPH, CPH, Jennifer Marshall, PhD, CPH

Florida’s rate of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) is three times higher than the national rate (0.67/1,000 vs. 0.21/1,000). The Florida Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program serves families who may be at a higher risk for SUID. This evaluation assesses MIECHV participants’ practices, beliefs, furnishings, education received, and other influences on infant sleep environments. The research team conducted interviews with caregivers who were involved in the sleeping regimen. Participants recalled safe sleep education from home visitors and follow many of the guidelines. Participants also convey those guidelines to other caregivers with mixed success. A few participants reported co-sleeping and a variety of furnishings are used in different sleep settings. Participants are open to receiving free infant sleep furnishings, but their intentions to use them are less certain.

Presenters
MF

Marshara Fross

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

367 Emergency Room Use and Unmet Healthcare Needs among Children in the United States
Mary Hill, BS

Data from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) were used to explore the association between emergency room use and the presence of an unmet need for healthcare among children 0-17 years old. Findings indicate that children who did not have healthcare services available in their area or who had difficulty getting an appointment were more likely to have an emergency room visit. These findings demonstrate the continued need to address unmet healthcare needs in children. As medical costs continue to rise, initiatives must be put in place to improve the healthcare system for children in the United States.

Presenters
MJ

Mary J. Hill, BS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

368 Residential Mobility and School Performance
Zaire Totty BA

This study aims to assess the association between rates of residential mobility and school behavior and academic performance among children ages 5 to 17 years old.

Presenters
ZA

Zaire Adia Totty

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

369 Prevalence of prenatal diagnosis among children born with Orofacial clefts in Florida.
Shruti Kaushik, BDS, MPH candidate, Nisha Vijayakumar, BDS, MPH, PhD candidate, Oluyemisi Falope, MBBS, MPH, PhD candidate, Vanessa Sharon, MPH Candidate, Jean -Paul Tanner, MPH, PhD, Russell S. Kirby, PHD MS, Jennifer Marshall, PhD,CPH

The research team conducted preliminary analysis on The Family Experiences Survey for Families of Children Born with Orofacial Clefts in Florida to examine the prevalence of prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and genetic counseling among those with cleft lip or cleft palate. Preliminary results from 72 responses showed that among the cases of orofacial cleft not diagnosed prenatally, cleft palate constituted the highest proportion of cases. Our research is aimed to identify existing gaps in service provided and resources available to influence changes at a systemic level.

Presenters
SK

Shruti Kaushik, BDS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

370 From Farm to Landfill: Results of a Campus-Community Awareness Event to Promote Sustainable Food Systems
Whitney Fung, M.S., Jennifer Marshall, Ph.D., Alicia L. Best, Ph.D., & Ellen M. Daley, Ph.D.

To increase awareness of local, sustainable food systems resources and student engagement in community efforts, a campus-community educational event was held in spring 2017. Results provide lessons learned of how campuses and communities can promote sustainable food systems and collaborate to offer more educational opportunities for students and the public.

Presenters
WF

Whitney Fung, M.S.

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

371 Birth defects brochure dissemination plan study
Oluyemisi Falope MBBS, MPH; Nisha Vijayakumar BDS, MPH; Shruti Kaushik BDS, Vanessa Sharon MS, Jean -Paul Tanner PhD, Russell S. Kirby PhD, & Jennifer Marshall PhD

The research team created an evaluation plan to obtain feedback from patients and providers about a statewide birth defects brochure. This study builds on a previous brochure development study where interviews and focus groups were conducted with providers and parents to gather information on readability, quality, overall impression likelihood and barriers to distribution. The research study seeks to evaluate the helpfulness of the brochure and provide feedback on further improvements.

Presenters
OF

Oluyemisi Falope, MBBS, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

372 The Impact of Prenatal Breastfeeding Education on Breastfeeding Knowledge and Infant Feeding Intention in a Diverse, Low-Income Population
A Adamu  MBBS, A Louis-Jacques MD, I. Hernandez PhD, A. Huerta RN, D. Spatz, PhD, S Običan MD

Low income women are associated with lower breastfeeding rates. This is a study about a prenatal educational session done to improve knowledge on breastfeeding. And assessment of how effective it was.

Presenters
AM

Abdullahi Musa Adamu, MBBS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

373 Young Children, Adverse Experiences, and Social Emotional Development
Bjoerke, Anne; Kirby, Russel; and Sayi, Takudzwa

This study explores the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the association between ACEs and poor social-emotional outcomes in children ages 0-3 years old.

Presenters
AB

Anne Bjoerke

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

374 Mediator/Moderator Analysis of Latino STYLE: Parent-Child Communication and Other Factors Influencing the Efficacy of a Randomized, Controlled Trial of an Adolescent HIV Intervention
Evan Hegarty, B.S., Celia Lescano, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Humberto Lopez-Castillo, MD, Ph.D., CPH

This study examined the potential mediation effect of parent-adolescent communication on the impact of an HIV-intervention on risky sexual behaviors, as well as potential moderation effects of adolescent characteristics including gender, acculturation, and age of first sexual intercourse. Findings have implications for future interventions aimed at reducing sexually transmitted diseases in at-risk populations.

Presenters
EH

Evan Hegarty, B.S.

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

375 Concentrations of Phthalates in Dust in Day Care Centers Around Tampa Bay.
Nisha Vijayakumar BDS, MPH, Micheal Acheampong M.Sc, Jennifer Marshall PHD, Foday Jaward PHD

Phthalates are endocrine disrupting compounds that are used in plasticizers in various household items and in children’s toys. Phthalates get leached out into the environment and settle in the dust. Phthalates illicit various health effects through different routes of exposure. In young children, the exposure is usually through ingestion and dermal. This study aimed to quantify the amount of phthalates that are present in dust in environments that young children play and spend time such as day care centers.

Presenters
NV

Nisha Vijayakumar, BDS, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

376 WITHDRAWN The Effect of Medications with Anticholinergic Properties on Cognition: Results from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Study.
Malinee Neelamegam, B.Biomed Sc, MBA, MPH; Janice Zgibor, RPh, PhD; Henian Chen, MD, PhD; Kathleed O'rourke, PhD; Kaarin Anstey PhD

As comorbidities increase with age, the use of pharmaceuticals for medical management of chronic conditions in the elderly is inevitable. Several clinical guidelines have cautioned against the use of inappropriate medications in the elderly, due to the possible link to degenerative changes in the aging brain. This study looks at the effect of one such medication group, anticholinergics, on multi-domain cognitve decline over time, in a sample of older adults.

Presenters
MN

Malinee Neelamegam, B.Bio.Med, MBA, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

377 Quantifying the Impact of Negative Publicity on Spontaneous Reporting in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS): A tale of Intranasal Zicam cold products.
Nnadozie Emechebe, MPH, Kevin Kip, PhD

The impact of negative publicity on reporting of adverse events for products implicated in an FDA safety alert is well documented. However, the impact of such publicity on drugs closely related to the implicated drug has not been established. We describe the impact of an FDA safety alert of intranasal Zicam cold products formulated with zinc on reporting of adverse events (principally anosmia) for related (non-alert) Zicam products.

Presenters
NC

Nnadozie C. Emechebe, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

378 How Big is a Big Hazard Ratio?
Yuanyuan Lu  Ph.D. student, Henian Chen, MD, Ph.D.

In recent years, both scientists and the general public have expressed a growing concern about the difficulty of evaluating research findings. Reviewers for manuscripts and grant proposals are interested to know that how big is a big treatment effect of a medical intervention. In our paper, we propose a new method for interpreting the size of hazard ratio by relating it to Cohen's d.

Presenters
YL

Yuanyuan Lu

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

379 Non-Zero Autocorrelation quantitated by employing a First-Order Durbin-Watson Test for determining Sociodemographic and Landscape Covariates Geospatially associated with Prostate Cancer Prevalence in Hillsborough County, Florida
Mmadili Ilozumba BSc, Toni Panaou MCE PhD, Fahad Mukhtar MD MPH, Nnadozie Emechebe Bpharm MPH, Samuel Alao MD MPH, Benjamin Jacob MSPH PhD

Although linear and non-linear regression models have been constructed to determine covariates associated with prevalence for many chronic infections, they have been underutilized in prostate cancer research at the county level. In this analysis, we constructed a multivariate linear regression model and a first-order Durbin-Watson autocorrelation model for Hillsborough County in Florida. In so doing, we were able to quantitate a linear estimate (median household income) at an alpha level of 0.05. In the spatial probabilistic paradigm, we were able to determine clustering tendencies at the zip code polygon level. Our model illustrated a positive autocorrelation. We were also able to identify a georeferencible hotspot location within the zip code polygon. Targeting georeferencible locations of county areas representing populations vulnerable to prostate cancer in ArcGIS and SAS can be an effective tool for implementing county level cancer control strategies.

Presenters
MI

Mmadili Ilozumba, Bsc, MSPH

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

380 A Cluster Randomized Trial Assessing the Improvement in Depression Score in Diabetic Patients Treated by Certified Diabetes Educators Versus Usual Care.
Fahad Mukhtar MD, MPH; Markku Malmi Jr. MPH; Janice Zgibor RPh, PhD, CPH, FACE

The study compared the mean change in depression score for patients with diabetes treated by Certified Diabetes educators and those who were treated by their primary care providers. There was no significant difference in depression score in the two groups compared over a one year period.

Presenters
FM

Fahad Mukhtar

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

381 The Association Between Poor Sleep and Chronic Low Back Pain: An Analysis of 2012 National Health Interview Survey Data
Kenneth A. Taylor, PT, DPT, OCS, Skai W. Schwartz, PhD

This analysis adds to a growing body of evidence that indicates impaired sleep has a significant relationship with persistent pain states. As chronic low back pain is one of the most common complaints among regular opioid prescription users and the U.S. is currently in the midst of an opioid epidemic, understanding more about chronic low back pain is paramount to identifying effective treatments with lower likelihoods of serious adverse events and work toward programs aimed at the prevention of chronic low back pain at the individual and population level.

Presenters
KA

Kenneth Adam Taylor, PT, DPT, OCS

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

382 The Impact of Using Different Reference Populations on Measurement of Breast Cancer-Related Cognitive Impairment Rates
Jonathan D. Clapp, MS; George Luta; Brent J. Small; Tim A. Ahles; James C. Root; Deena Graham; Arti Hurria; Paul B. Jacobsen; Heather Jim; Brenna C. McDonald; Robert A. Stern; Andrew J. Saykin; Jeanne S. Mandelblatt

The choice of specific neuropsychological tests may vary across studies based on the domains of cognitive function posited to be most affected by the type of cancer and its treatments, as well as by individual experience of the investigators. Moreover, rates of impairment may be biased if the characteristics of the reference populations for each test are not comparable to each other and/or to the cancer study sample. In this analysis, the rates of cognitive impairment prior to systemic therapy was compared by using four different reference groups and a single, standard definition of impairment.

Presenters
JD

Jonathan D. Clapp, MS

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

383 Partner Conflict within Romantic Relationships in Emerging Adulthood: A linear Mixed Effect Model
Lan Xu, Nisha Vijayakumar, Yuanyuan Lu, Henian Chen, Yangxin Huang

Emerging adulthood is characterized as a life stage between adolescence and adulthood. It is an important developmental milestone where in emotional, psychosocial growth occurs. One of the most remarkable features of emerging adulthood is the extension of autonomy and financial independence, as more young adults are taking longer to settle into occupational tracks due to prolonged educational periods and delay in career commitment which has resulted in delay in pursuing marriage. Intimacy and intrapersonal relationships during emerging adulthood have short term and long term consequences. The objective of this study is to examine the patterns of romantic involvement and relationships during emerging adulthood and the role of age and other predictors in partner conflict.

Presenters
LX

Lan Xu

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

384 Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (A.R.T.) in Specialized Military Populations
Jessica Berumen, MPH, CPH, Kevin Kip, PhD, FAHA

Under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Kip, Jessica Berumen conducted a study comparing PTSD prevalence and treatment in a sample of the military population, specifically examining Accelerated Resolution Therapy (A.R.T.). The study began with a thorough literature review analyzing outcomes observed and recorded in military subgroup populations receiving standard trauma therapies in the military and veteran healthcare systems. The student then worked alongside the instructor in analyzing data sets using SPSS to investigate possible differential health outcomes in these same military subgroups (special operation soldiers versus conventional soldiers) receiving the Accelerated Resolution Therapy to determine if similar or different results were seen. Secondary data analysis was also utilized in some areas in order to determine the adjusted change and effect size of the two populations. Finally, statistical comparison of the results was conducted to determine not only if A.R.T. therapy was more effective than other traditional PTSD treatments, but also to conclude if the therapy was more, less, or equally effective in the population of special operation soldiers compared to conventionally trained military soldiers.

Presenters
JB

Jessica Berumen, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

385 Predictive and Spatial analysis for determining the impact of Sociodemographic factors on Contraceptive use among Women Living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA) in Kenya: Implications for Policies and Practice
Menkeoma L. Okoli, MBBS, Somtochukwu Ojukwu, MBBS, Samuel Alao, MPH, Nnadozie Emechebe, MPH, Kevin Kip, PhD

Despite the availability and knowledge of various contraceptive methods, consistent utilization in women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA) within the reproductive age group remains below the SDGs and Family planning 2020 goal. This study examines the association between sociodemographic factors and contraceptive use including the effect of clustering tendencies of these factors on contraceptive usage among WLWHA in Kenya.

Presenters
ML

Menkeoma Laura Okoli

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

386 Anti-CelTOS Transmission Blocking Activity in vivo and in vitro against P. falciparum by Epitope-specific Monoclonal Antibodies
Shulin Xu, PhD, Alison E. Roth, Richard T. Luque, Nichole D. Salinas, Niraj H. Tolia, Samantha Barnes, Courtney Herman, John H. Adams

Developed a successful CelTOS mAb mediated P. falciparum oocyst inhibition assay by using luciferase transgenic mouse-adapted parasite clone PfKF7G4 in vitro with SMFA and in vivo with a P. falciparum-humanized mouse model.

Presenters
SX

Shulin Xu, PhD

Faculty, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

387 Partial characterization of Plasmodium falciparum protein kinase ABCk2 (PfABCk2)
Muhammad Khalid, PhD; Francis Ntumngia, PhD; John Adams, PhD

There are approximately 100 protein kinases in this parasite that are involved in phosphorylation of asexual blood stage. Hence, the phosphorylation plays an important part in the development of different stages of malarial parasites. Due to their significance in the parasite lifecycle, one of the protein kinase of P. falciparum belongs to the ABC-1 family of proteins. The bioinformatic analysis and preliminary results of PfABCK2 showed the heterologous expression of this protein.

Presenters
MK

Muhammad Khalid, PhD

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

388 WITHDRAWN Characterization of the humoral and cell-mediated responses elicited by the Duffy binding protein, DBP II
Sai Lata De, PhD; Shulin Xu, PhD; Francis Ntumngia, PhD; John H Adams, PhD

We are immunizing inbred and outbred mice with a malaria parasite protein, Duffy binding protein (DBP). We want to study the effect of sex and immune gene polymorphisms and their ability to predict the immunogenicity and efficacy of our immunizations. We also want to study the memory responses after repeated immunizations and characterize the humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

Presenters
SL

Sai Lata De, PhD

Post Doctoral Scholar, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

389 Using remote sensing methodologies to combat schistosomiasis in northern Senegal
Caitlin Wolfe, Chris Haggerty, Raphael Ndione, Sidy Bakhoum, Souleymane Sow, Nicolas Jouanard, Gilles Riveau, Jason Rohr

Schistosomiasis, one of the world’s neglected tropical diseases caused by the Schistosoma parasite, affects more than 240 million people a year with the current yearly control strategy of mass drug administration (MDA) costs estimating at $100 million yet per the World Health Organization (WHO) only 34.4% of those in need of treatment receive it annually. Schistosomiasis disables more than kills, commonly causing symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, blood stool while also capable of causing more severe symptoms including kidney damage and bladder cancer. More than 90% of schistosomiasis cases are found in the African region in areas without access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation and Senegal is no exception, where an epidemic of unprecedented proportions flooded through the villages along the Senegal River and its tributaries after the construction of the Diama Dam in 1986. Presently, MDA of praziquantel remains the backbone of schistosomiasis control strategy; however, these efforts are limited due to insufficient drug availability and the drug offers no lasting protection so re-infection occurs rapidly when those recently treated access the infested waterbodies again. Furthermore, repeatedly supplying remote areas with the required drugs remains a logistical challenge. In Senegal specifically, WHO estimates MDA coverage of the at-risk population is less than 10%. In May of 2012, the World Health Assembly called for new procedures to interrupt transmission in order to eliminate schistosomiasis. Effective control of schistosomiasis will require more than semi-regular drug treatments. Previously, researcher teams in Ghana and Morocco demonstrated that regular removal of certain aquatic plants decreased the prevalence of schistosomiasis in nearby villages. We propose to address this challenge by isolating the unique spectral signature of different types of submerged and emergent aquatic vegetation known to support the freshwater snail vectors of schistosomiasis to identify high-density habitats, thus combining remote sensing technologies and vegetation removal with MDA programs to improve schistosomiasis control in Northern Senegal and, perhaps, beyond.

Presenters
CW

Caitlin Wolfe, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

390 Navigating New Routes: Evaluating Access to Healthcare Services Among Resettled Congolese Refugees in Hillsborough County
Celina Flocks Monaghan, Alexis Pullia, Shirley Castillo

This research project examines the barriers perceived by resettled refugees in regards to healthcare access. Specifically, it analyzes the perspectives of refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who were resettled in Tampa, Florida. This project provides an analysis of collected evidence on why refugees experience transportation, language, and overall positive health outcome barriers.

Presenters
CF

Celina Flocks-Monaghan

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

391 The BRFSS and Depression: Differences in Definitions
Thomas Agrusti, BA; Dr. Troy Quast, PhD, MS, BS

This study analyzed the relationship between a person having a professional diagnosis of depression and the person's depression severity score from a screening test. The study also analyzed the relationship between severity of depression and having health insurance.

Presenters
avatar for Thomas Agrusti

Thomas Agrusti

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

392 Perceived Affordability of Mental Health Care Post-Affordable Care Act (ACA): Analysis of Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS)
Natasha Kurji, MPH, CPH, Barbara Langland Orban, PhD, and Jacqueline Wiltshire, PhD, MPH 

This study analyzed whether the perceived affordability of mental health care and counseling has improved since the implementation of the ACA and its requirement for all plans offered in the Marketplace to cover the 10 essential benefits (particularly mental health care).

Presenters
NK

Natasha Kurji

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

393 The Birds, the Bees, and Special Needs: Making Sex Education Inclusive Using Universal Design for Learning
Linsey Grove, MPH, CPH, CHES, Dianne Morrison-Beedy, PhD, WHNP, FNAP, FAANP, FAAN, Janet Hess, DrPH, Russell Kirby, PhD, MS

Adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) face multiple barriers to receiving developmentally-appropriate sex education in the classroom. Using the Universal Design for Learning framework, an evidence-based sexual risk reduction intervention called HIPTeens was supplemented with curriculum components to meet the needs of various types of learners, including those with moderate intellectual disabilities.

Presenters
LG

Linsey Grove, MPH, CPH, CHES

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

394 The Public Perception of Addiction
Melody Chavez, MPH, RD, LDN

Addiction is a condition that is characterized as a primary, chronic disease that results when a person consumes a substance or participates in an activity that can be pleasurable. The continuation of these actions become compulsive and disrupts daily. The public perception of addiction can be viewed negatively in a variety of ways in society. Such perceptions can develop attitudes, opinions and stigmas around an individual with addiction that can influence substance abuse-related decisions from many levels within society. Focus groups aim to address individuals perceptions of addcition in the Tampa Bay area.

Presenters
avatar for Melody Nichole Chavez, MPH, RDN/LDN

Melody Nichole Chavez, MPH, RDN/LDN

Doctoral student, College of Public Health
Doctoral Student in the College of Public Health, Community & Family Health. | Research interest in provider's prescription behaviors in opioids.


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

395 Spreading the (fake) News: A Study of Health Misinformation on Social Media Using the Zika Virus Case
Silvia Sommariva, MPA, MSc; Cheryl Vamos, PhD; Alexios Mantzarlis, MA, MSc; Lillie Dao, MA; Dinorah Martinez Tyson, PhD.

Using the Zika virus as case study, this study explores the spread of health messages through Social Networking Sites, highlighting the role of the “fake news” phenomenon in health communication practice.

Presenters
SS

Silvia Sommariva, MSc, MPA

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

396 Predicting Vulnerable Opioid Epidemic Populations in Florida at the County-level through Linear Regression, Geographic Information System Techniques, and Cartographic Mapping
Theresa Nguyen, B.S., Toni Panaou, Ph.D., MCE, and Benjamin G. Jacob, Ph.D.

Fatal opioids overdose are preventable deaths, but opioids and prescription drugs are often used by many to treat diseases. Previous research on opioid epidemics, sought to identify trends and demographics to educate and create interventions and policies. In this innovative research, geographic information system mapping techniques and linear regression was employed to visually and mathematically represent empirical, county-level, opioid data.

Presenters
TN

Theresa Nguyen

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

397 Feed-A-Bull: Employing Evaluation Research to Inform Campus Food Pantry Policy
Jamie Paola, BA, MPH candidate, CPH provisional, Rita DeBate, PhD, MPH, FAED, FAAHB, Jivan James, undergraduate

Food insecurity and diet quality are underlying yet critical issues that affect college student health and success. In order to gain insight on this topic, which is usually tailored towards community populations, a mixed methods study was used to report results from a process and impact evaluation of a campus-based food pantry. The results illustrate high reoccurrences of food insecurity with hunger and poor diet quality. Findings led to the suggestions for improving and refining student quality of life, wellbeing, and success.

Presenters
JP

Jamie Paola, BA

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

398 Dietary Intake in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Florida and Comparisons with Nationally Representative Data
Acadia Webber, MS, Heewon Gray, PhD, RDN, Chantell Robinson, BS

This cross-sectional study examines dietary intake in children aged 2-17 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) living in Florida compared to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data on children aged 1-18 years. Preliminary 24-hour recall data from 33 participants were analyzed to determine energy, nutrient, and food item intake.

Presenters
AW

Acadia Webber, MS

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

399 USF Success and Wellness Coaching: A holistic wellness approach to student success
Taylor Grimm, Bachelor of Science, Master of Public Health student; Angelica Harris, Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts; & Rita DeBate, Master of Public Health, PhD Public Health

Success and Wellness Coaching is a new, free initiative for USF Tampa students. This program aims to provide a holistic wellness approach for student success and well-being. USF Success and Wellness coaches are certified through Real Balance Global Wellness Services, LLC. Both undergraduate and graduate students are able to request their own one-on-one Success and Wellness Coach to work through goal setting and achieving over a course of 3 sessions, or more if the student requests. Our coaches aid in holding the student accountable for their progress and success.

Presenters
TG

Taylor Grimm, BS

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

400 Predicting Intention to Seek Professional Help Among Male College Students
Amy Gatto, MPH, Gregor Rafal, BS, Rita DeBate, PhD

The prevalence and severity of poor mental wellbeing on college campuses continues to rise with male students less likely to seek professional help. This cross-sectional study sought to determine factors predicting help-seeking behaviors in a large sample (n=1,242) of male college students. A 71-item online survey assessed mental health literacy, attitudes, subjective norms, stigma, and help-seeking intentions. Multivariate regression analyses revealed help-seeking intention for academic concerns (p<.001), beliefs (p<.001), impact on self-confidence (p<.001), knowledge (p=.005), and norms (p=.028) were statistically significant with help-seeking intentions for behavioral health issues (R2=.43; F(10, 987) = 74.672, p <.001).

Presenters
AG

Amy Gatto, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

401 Post analysis Individual and Organizational Readiness Assessment for Parental Mental Health Intervention Implementation among All Florida MIECHV Program Staff
Priyashi Manani, , Kimberly Hailey, BS, CPH, Pamela Birriel, PhD, MPH, CHES, Jennifer Marshall, PhD, MPH, CPH

The Florida Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program serves pregnant women and families living in the high-risk communities. Maternal depression negatively influences the mental health and behavior of children living in the home, leading to negative parent-child interactions. To accurately measure individual and organizational readiness for a Parental Mental Health program, baseline and post-analysis data were compared among implementation sites. The Diffusions of Innovations (DOI) Theory was used to explain how new ideas or innovations "diffuse" into an organization. Using DOI Theory, the Evaluation Team at USF created the "Parental Mental Health Implementation Readiness Survey."

Presenters
PA

Priyashi Atulbhai Manani

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

402 Factors Associated with Breastfeeding Duration: Positive Association of a Breastfeeding Supportive Social Environment
Alexis L. Woods Barr, MS, BS, Ellen Schafer, PhD, MPH, MCHES, Erika Thompson, PhD, MPH, CPH, Vinita Sharma, MPH, BPH, Regina Roig-Romero, MPH, MCHES, IBCLC, Ellen M. Daley, PhD, MPH, Stephanie L. Marhefka, PhD

The positive health effects of breastfeeding are well documented for both the mother and baby. In the United States, breastfeeding initiation rates are steadily increasing. However, breastfeeding duration rates still lag behind national recommended goals. Using data from the Infants Feeding Practices Study II, this study assessed the association between the overall subjective norms of the participants' social network and breastfeeding duration. The predictor was a latent variable measuring the collective impact of the participant's social networks' subjective norms on breastfeeding duration. Controlling for demographic factors, as weighted overall subjective norms became more positive toward breastfeeding it was associated with longer breastfeeding duration.

Presenters
AL

Alexis L Barr, BS, MS

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

403 Classification tree analysis to identify at risk population for low colorectal cancer screening status in Florida
Korede Adegoke, PhD, Claudia Aguado Loi, PhD, Menkeoma Okoli, MPH, Virginia Liddell, MPH, Carol Bryant, PhD

Despite the effectiveness of screening and the availability of various screening methods, screening rate remains below Healthy People 2020 goal. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of populations at-risk for not being up-to-date on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in Florida.

Presenters
VL

Virginia Liddell

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

404 HPV vaccination Rates and Factors Associated with HPV vaccination among Transgender College Students
Coralia Vázquez-Otero, JD, MPH; Stacey Griner, MPH; Erika L. Thompson, PhD, MPH; Rachel Logan, MPH; Cheryl A. Vamos, PhD, MPH; Ellen M. Daley, PhD, MPH

Human Papillomavirus is a sexually transmitted infection associated with genital warts and cancer. In the US, the HPV vaccine is recommended for transgender persons through age 26. This study used the National College Health Assessment to assess HPV vaccination rates and identify factors associated with HPV vaccination among transgender students. 70% transgender students reported having the HPV vaccine. Older transgender students were less likely to be vaccinated. Relationship status, race, and sexual orientation were not significant predictors for this population. Findings suggest that interventions targeting older transgender students might be helpful to increase HPV vaccine uptake.

Presenters
CV

Coralia Vazquez-Otero, JD, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

405 Diet and Mealtime Concerns in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Florida - A Parental Perspective
Chantell Robinson, BS, Heewon Gray, PhD, RDN, Acadia Webber, MS

This qualitative study explores parent perceptions of mealtime behaviors and diet-related concerns in children aged 2-17 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) living in Florida. Preliminary data from four focus groups were analyzed for themes regarding parents' concerns related to their children's diet and mealtime behaviors.

Presenters
CR

Chantell Robinson

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

406 Better Bites to Fun Bites: Dissemination of Community Based Prevention Marketing for Policy Development in Florida
Vijay Prakashbhai Prajapati, BDS, MPH; Mahmooda Khaliq Pasha, PhD; Megan Carmichael; Rocio Bailey; Richard Curtin, Quinn Lundquist, MPH, CPH, James Lindenberger, Carol Bryant

Health Background: Community coalitions often lag the ability to advocate for evidence based policies due to multiple reasons. For 15 years the Florida Prevention Research Center (FPRC) has developed and tested the Community-Based Prevention Marketing (CBPM) framework to overcome these challenges and assist community coalitions in building policies and programs to promote behavior change. Community coalitions often lack the ability to advocate for evidence-based policies, due to cost and accessibility. A way to bridge this divide is through web-based learning.

Presenters
VP

Vijay Prakashbhai Prajapati, BDS, MPH

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

407 When the Bough Breaks: Exploring the Reasons Behind Persistently Higher U.S. State Infant Mortality Rates Among African Americans
Tarilate Aroriode, MD; William Sappenfield, MD, MPH, CPH; Janice Zgibor, RPh, PhD, CPH, FACE

Black infant mortality rates vary widely in the U.S. We compared the prevalence of risk factors and corresponding infant mortality rates between the three states with the highest and lowest Blacks rates. Stratified analysis was performed to examine for interactions and confounding. Highest rate states had higher prevalence of adverse risk factors and higher infant mortality rates for all risk factor strata. Only birthweight was associated: a higher prevalence of 500-1,499g births and higher mortality rates among those >1,500g. Unexplored risk factors and causes of deaths may further explain the difference. Corresponding relationship with rates in Whites should be examined.

Presenters
TA

Tarilate Aroriode, MD

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

408 Evaluating Florida Systems of Care for Zika Infected Individuals
Carlos Parra, B.S.; Jennifer Delva, B.S.; Jennifer Marshall, PhD MPH

In order to better understand the systems of healthcare in Florida for Zika positive individuals, we followed the Florida Department of Health's Zika process maps for pregnant women who were seeking testing in the Miami-Dade and Broward area. By using journey mapping approach in conjuction with focus groups and interviews, we were able to take a more personal look at the systems of care to identify patient points of contact, key partners and agencies, mosquito control initiatives, as well as strengths and challenges within the system. We conclude with recommendations on ways to improve care as per the advice and information given by interviewed experts and essential personnel in the field.

Presenters
CP

Carlos Parra

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

409 Talking to a Dental Provider about HPV: Comfortability among Young Adult Patients
Nicole Des Champs; Cheryl Vamos, PhD, MPH; Erika Thompson, PhD, MPH; Coralia Vazquez-Otero, JD, MPH, CPH; Mika Kadono, MA; Ellen Daley, PhD, MPH

This study assessed a vaccine-eligible sample's comfort talking to dental providers about HPV-related topics.

Presenters
ND

Nicole Des Champs

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

410 Meet the People Where They Are: A qualitative study of factors affecting chronic disease in Tampa women
Krys M. Johnson, MPH, Ronee Wilson, PhD, MPH, Deborah Austin, PhD, Conchita Burpee, Janice Zgibor, RPh, PhD, FACE

Chronic diseases continue to negatively affect our population as a whole, including women of child-bearing age, who may be more likely to develop or mismanage chronic conditions due to lack of access to healthcare or to enabling factors for healthy behavior. This qualitative study sought to determine health beliefs and barriers to health in disadvantaged Tampa communities via interviews and focus groups to inform the future implementation of a chronic disease prevention program. Participants identified financial, temporal, topographic, and stigma-related barriers to health and emphasized the importance of spiritual and emotional health in addition to managing chronic physical conditions.

Presenters
KM

Krys M Johnson, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

411 Florida Birth Certificate Accuracy Initiative (BCI)
Chinyere N. Reid, MBBS, MPH; Paige Alitz, MPH; Estefania Rubio, MD, MPH; William Sappenfield, MD, MPH, CPH

Improving the birth certificate accuracy in Florida state.

Presenters
CN

Chinyere N Reid, MBBS, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

412 Qualitative Assessment of Mental Health Literacy and Help-seeking Behaviors in Undergraduate Males
Gregor Rafal, BS; Amy Gatto, MPH; Sarah Powell, BSPH; Rita DeBate, MPH, FAED, FAAHB

Male college students are unlikely to seek professional mental health services despite the fact that the prevalence of poor mental wellbeing on college campuses is rising. This qualitative study sought to understanding deficiencies in mental health literacy (MHL) and help seeking intention in an all-male undergraduate sample (n=26). Interviews were conducted in a semi-structured manner using previously developed and validated MHL vignettes. Analysis is on-going but preliminary results indicate males lack knowledge pertaining to mental health concerns, they recommend professional service and generally do not use them, and males face many barriers to seeking care.

Presenters
GR

Gregor Rafal

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

413 Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: The Impact of Body Image on Condom Use among College Students
Oberne, Alison, MA, MPH, CPH; Vamos, Cheryl, PhD, MPH

College students are at an increased risk for STIs and engage in inconsistent condom use. Body image may be an important predictor of condom use. This study administered a sexual health survey to examine the relationship between body image (Body Appreciation Scale-2) and condom use during vaginal, oral, and anal sex. Participants with higher body appreciation were more likely to use condoms during their last vaginal sex than those with lower body appreciation. Body image did not affect condom use during oral or anal sex. Future research should explore how best to promote body image and safer sexual health practices.

Presenters
AO

Alison Oberne, MA MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health
Ms. Alison Oberne has worked in both research and academia to enhance the field of public health. Ms. Oberne has worked as a Faculty Instructor at the University of South Florida, College of Public Health for the past five years.  She has presented at local, regional, and national... Read More →


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

414 Internet-Based Biomarker Collection Feasibility: Experiences of a Tobacco Cessation Program for People Living with HIV
Shanda Vereen, MSPH; DeAnne Turner, MPH; Melody Chavez, MPH, RDN, LDN; Regina Roig-Romero, MPH; Elizabeth Lockhart, MPH, PhD; Stephanie L. Marhefka, PhD

This project introduces video-conferencing as a method for biomarker collection in research and will explain how biomarker collection via video-conferencing was implemented in a pilot ehealth intervention.

Presenters
SV

Shanda Vereen

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

415 Association Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Nightmare Disorder and Incident Herpes Zoster
Pragati Ghimire-Aryal, MD MPH; Skai W Schwartz, PhD; Yuri V Sebastiao, PhD MPH; Dr. William M Anderson, MD; Philip R Foulis, MD MPH

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and herpes zoster (shingles) represent treatable and preventable conditions respectively. Nightmares are strongly associated with OSA and may represent troubled sleep. All of these conditions are of growing concern in the Veterans Administration patient population. Inadequate sleep may result in a weakened immune system, which is a potential factor in the reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus which causes shingles.

Presenters
PG

Pragati Ghimire-Aryal

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

416 Understanding Awareness and Perceptions of Immediate Postpartum LARC Use among Women and Clinicians: A systematic Review
Rachel Logan, MPH; Erika Thompson, PhD, MPH; Cheryl Vamos, PhD, MPH; Emily Bronson, MA; Linda Detman, PhD; Rumour Piepenbrink; Ellen Daley, PhD, MPH; Bill Sappenfield, MD, MPH

This systematic literature review identified patient and provider knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding immediate postpartum long-acting reversible contraception (LARC).

Presenters
RG

Rachel G Logan, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

417 Exploring Reproductive Health of Congolese Refugees through the Perspectives of Providers, Caregivers, and Community Advocates in Tampa Bay, Florida
Linda Bomboka, MPH. Dinorah Martinez Tyson, MPH, PhD

Key Informant Interviews were conducted with providers, advocates, and community leaders to explore the reproductive health experiences of Congolese refugee women who resettle in Tampa, Florida.

Presenters
LB

Linda Bomboka

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

418 National Media Narrative of Opiate-Using Mothers and their Infants With Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Tara Foti, MPH

This is a narrative analysis of national news media stories of opiate use during pregnancy to understand the characterization of the mother and infant, and identification of the narrative villain.

Presenters
TF

Tara Foti, MPH

Doctoral student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

419 A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Any Alcohol Use on High-Risk Sexual Behaviors (HRSB) Among Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)
Lindsey Fiedler, MSc; Shivani Desai, BS; Humberto López Castillo, MD, PhD, CPH; Celia M. Lescano, PhD

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), continue to be a large public health burden among men MSM. HRSB are potentially destructive behaviors, engaged in voluntarily, regardless of the level of understanding, if any, of possible adverse consequences. HRSB encompass activities that increase the odds of developing an STI, including infection with HIV, such as any alcohol use.

Presenters
LF

Lindsey Fiedler, MSc

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

420 Geographic Information System Mapping for Unintentional Injuries in Florida in Age Group 0-4 years, 2014-2016 to Prevent Unintentional Injuries in families served by MIECHV Program.
Temitope Bello, MPH, Amita Patil  MPH, CPH ; Temitope Bello  B.Pharm; Jennifer Marshall  PhD, CPH

Geographic Information System Mapping was done for Unintentional Injuries in Florida in Age Group 0-4 years, 2014-2016. The high-risk counties, risk-factors will be focused more on preventing unintentional injuries in the families served by  MIECHV Program. Health education will be given to prevent injuries in children served by the MIECHV Program.

Presenters
TB

Temitope Bello, MPH

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

421 A meta-analysis of the effects of heavy episodic drinking on
high-risk sexual behaviors (HRSB) among men who have sex with men (MSM)
Shivani Desai, BS, CPhT; Lindsey Fiedler, MSc; Humberto López Castillo, MD, PhD, CPH; Celia M. Lescano, PhD

The primary objective of this study is to estimate the total effect size of heavy episodic drinking onto four risky sexual behaviors, namely: condomless anal intercourse (insertive, receptive, or any), condomless oral intercourse, multiple sexual partners, and transactional sex.

Presenters
SM

Shivani Mahesh Desai

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

422 School level factors associated with obesity: A systematic review of longitudinal observational studies
Janelle Barrera Ikan, BS and Heewon L. Gray, PhD., RD

A systematic review of the literature on longitudinal observational studies that look at school-level factors associated with obesity.

Presenters
JF

Janelle F Barrera Ikan, B.S.

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

423 The Florida Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program Evaluation: Findings from the Coordinated Intake and Referral Learning Sessions
Takudzwa Sayi, PhD, MA, MPhil; Oluwatosin Ajisope, MBBS; Rema Ramakrishnan, PhD, MPH; Amita Patil, BHMS; Deborah Cragun, PhD, MS; Jennifer Marshall, PhD, CPH

The Coordinated Intake & Referral (CI&R) system, a collaborative process, helps determine best services for families and optimizes resources utilization. The Florida MIECHV initiative, in collaboration with the State Title V agency developed models for CI&R system changes with eight Florida Healthy Start Coalitions. The MIECHV team conducted a process evaluation of the system changes using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research during three learning collaboratives. This study provides insight into characteristics of the coalition teams’ system changes, their methods of incorporating the CI&R model into sectional systems of care, and the accomplishments and barriers encountered throughout the process.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

424 A Quantitative and Geospatial Analysis of the University of South Florida’s Tobacco-Free Policy
Sarah E. Powell, BSPH; Amy Gatto, MPH; Rita DeBate, PhD, MPH, FAED, FAAHB; Liberty B. Sales, BSPH; Shahriar Zamani

This study aimed to analyze the implementation of USF Tobacco-Free policy on campus and the views of the campus community towards the newly established policy. Additionally, this study assessed the geospatial violations of the [Tobacco-Free] policy on campus. A mapped review of the violations provided a snapshot of the policy non-compliance across the campus. This study also discusses strategies for successful formation and implementation of tobacco-free policies on campus.

Presenters
SP

Sarah Powell

Masters student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

425 Screening of ALDH2 Interacting Proteins by Co-Immunoprecipitation and Mass Spectrometry
Irene John (B.S.), Jutaro Fukumoto (M.D, Ph.D.), Sahebgowda Patil (M.S.), Sudarshan Krishnamurthy (B.S.), Maria Helena Hernandez-Cuervo (M.D.), Mason Breitzig (B.S.), Matthew Alleyn (B.S.), Lakshmi Galam (Ph.D.), Ramani Soundarajan (Ph.D.), Richard Lockey (M.D.), Kari Basso (Ph.D.), Narasaiah Kolliputi (Ph.D.) 

Recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays an important role in protecting against oxidative stress in multiple organs, including the lung. Protein-protein interaction has long been known to affect critical cellular functions. Therefore, exploring unidentified binding partners of ALDH2 could improve our understanding of how ALDH2 counteracts oxidative stress.

Presenters
IJ

Irene John

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

426 Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: The Importance of Multiple-site Sampling
Sudarshan Krishnamurthy, Jutaro Fukumoto, Sahebgowda Patil, Irene John, Helena Hernandez-Cuervo, Matthew Alleyn, Mason Breitzig, Lakshmi Galam, Ramani Soundararajan, Kapilkumar N. Patel, Richard F. Lockey, Narasaiah Kolliputi

This project highlights the importance of multiple-site sampling in patients presenting with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

Presenters
SK

Sudarshan Krishnamurthy

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

427 Alterations in immunophenotype of autoimmune-prone hypomorphic RAG-deficient patients with CID-G/AI phenotype
Thomas Pennix, Matthew Stowell, Boglarka Ujhazi, Taco Kuijpers, Olajumoke Fadugba, John Sleasman, Benedict Neven, Waleed Al-Herz, Manish Butte, Elisabeth G. Hoyte, Joseph D. Hernandez, Janet S. Chou, Luigi D. Notarangelo, Eric Meffre, Krisztian Csomos, Jolan E. Walter

Prior case reports of patients with partial deficiency of RAG1/2 have not reported comprehensive characterization of B and T cell subsets nor identified populations that may promote autoimmunity. By using multiparametric flow cytometry approach, we noted significantly lower ratio of transitional and naïve mature B cells, while total memory B cells were enriched. Marginal zone and CD21^−/low anergic B cells were represented in significantly higher frequencies. Patients also had fewer Tregs and increased frequency of circulating Tfh cells. Alterations among these subsets may sustain autoreactive T and B cell compartments and prone patient for autoimmune complications.

Presenters

Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

428 Murine herpesvirus 68 infection in a two novel mouse models based on a patient with RAG2 F62L/F62L mutation and combined immunodeficiency
Bence Zakota, Boglarka Ujhazi MSc, Peter Medveczky MD, Krisztian Csomos PhD, Jolan E Walter MD PhD

Herpes virus infections are often observed prior to the onset of antibody-mediated autoimmunity in primary immunodeficiencies caused by hypomorphic mutations in recombination-activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2). Novel rag2^F62L/F62L and rag2^F62L/F62L mouse strains were designed to model patients with partial Rag deficiency. Mice were infected with murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) and cellular and humoral response were monitored. Concomitant antibody generation to virus and self-antigens were increased in hypomorphic rag mouse models suggestive of a polyclonal activation of autoreactive B cells and break in B cell tolerance.

Presenters
BZ

Bence Zakota

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

429 Distal Radius Salter Harris Fracture: A Case Report
Mitsy Audate, BA,BS

Case report of a 13 year old patient that presents with a Type II Salter-Harris fracture of the distal radius and developing complications.

Presenters
MM

Mitsy M. Audate

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

430 Prevalence and Management of Diabetes of Uninsured Patients in Free Clinics
Hadi Joud, Eslam Mohamed, Sabbir Mirza, Hozaifa Tabbaa, Mouaz Tabbaa, Rahul Mhaskar, Laurie Woodard, Abu-Sayeef Mirza

Diabetes is a widely prevalent disease that may be underlooked and ineffectively managed in the free health care setting. The majority of patients that come to low-resource clinics are uninsured and may be on suboptimal therapy. This puts them at a higher risk of uncontrolled diabetes and its associated poor outcomes and comorbidities. A retrospective chart review was done in nine free clinics. Preliminary results demonstrated that free clinics were managing a large proportion of new-onset diabetes and glycemic control was largely uncontrolled according to mean hemoglobin A1c values. Educational and resource interventions may improve diabetes management in free clinics.

Presenters
HJ

Hadi Joud

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

431 Resource Utilization in Delayed Graft Function Based on the Indication for Dialysis in Kidney Transplantation
Jasmine Boone, Jacentha Buggs MD, Radhe Mehta, Maryam Adesunkanmi, Ebonie Rogers BS, Ambuj Kumar MD MPH., Victor Bowers MD

Delayed graft function (DGF) or dialysis within seven days post kidney transplantation (KT) reportedly occurs up to 60% in deceased donors (DD) and 8% in living donors (LD).

Presenters
JB

Jasmine Boone

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

432 Liver Size Mismatch in Deceased Donor Transplantation
Musaab Tariq, Jacentha Buggs MD, Victor Bowers MD, Julio Sokolich MD, Nyingi Kemmer MD, Ebonie Rogers BS, Angel Alsina MD

With living donor liver transplantation, matching of donor/recipient volume is more structured and essential to successful outcomes. However, practices with deceased donor (DD) liver transplantation are flexible with less emphasis on size matching between the donor and recipient.

Presenters
MT

Musaab Tariq

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

433 Unique Recipient Benefits with Paired Kidney Donation
Alauna Pearson, Jacentha Buggs MD, Ebonie Rogers BS, Victor Bowers MD

Kidney transplantation is the treatment choice for ESRD with improved survival and cost benefit compared with dialysis. The imbalance of supply over demand along with ABO incompatibility has compelled expansion of the living donor pool to include the use of paired kidney donation (PKD).

Presenters
AP

Alauna Pearson

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

434 Long Term Outcomes of Liver Transplantation in the Direct-Acting Antiviral Era of Hepatitis C
Anwar Khan, Angel Alsina MD, Alexia Athienitis PhD, Alejandro Delgado, John Trendowski, Arun Konakanchi, Jacentha Buggs MD, Elizabeth Fallon PA-C, Erin Parkinson ARNP, Chris Albers MD, Nyingi Kemmer MD

There are no reports of long term outcomes of Hepatitis C (HCV) liver transplant (LTx) recipients in the direct-acting antiviral (DAA) era.

Presenters
AK

Anwar Khan

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

435 Intravenous Human Bone Marrow Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Transplantation into Symptomatic ALS Mice Potentially Repairs Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier
Mohammed Khatib, Surafuail Hailu, David Eve, Josean Cruz, Stephanie Navarro, Kayla J. Boccio, Ryan Ford, Paul R. Sanberg, Cesario V. Borlongan, Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) impairment in Amyotrophic Lateral Scleroses (ALS) is a hallmark of disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to determine effects of intravenous human bone marrow derived endothelial progenitor cell (hBMEPC; 1 x 10^6 cells) transplantation into symptomatic G93A mice for restoration of BSCB. Major benefits of cell transplants were: significantly delayed disease progression; hBMEPC engraftment into capillary walls; significantly decreased Evans blue extravasation into spinal cord parenchyma; and enhanced perivascular astrocyte end-feet capillary coverage. These novel data demonstrate benefits of hBMEPC transplantation for BSCB repair when treatment was initiated at the symptomatic disease stage, and may have implications for eventual restoration of barrier integrity in ALS patients.

Presenters
MK

Mohammed Khatib

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

436 WITHDRAWN Therapeutic effects of Coffee Against Alzheimer’s Disease through Immune Modulation
Umer Khan, BSc Biomedical Sciences Candidate; Cao Chuanhai, Ph.D.

Evidence from many epidemiological studies and scientific studies suggest coffee to be a possible therapeutic agent against Alzheimer's disease. This is a follow-up study of our lab's previous coffee project which concluded that caffeine synergizes with a component from coffee to provide cognitive and physiological benefits against AD through immune modulation. In this study, N2APP mice cells, which produce the Alzheimer causing toxic amyloid beta protein, are being treated with different coffee solutions at various concentrations. The purpose of this study is to find the type of coffee and the concentration that provides the most benefits by reducing amyloid beta protein levels without being toxic to the cells. Current data from the coffee/caffeine project suggests coffee as a possible best source of caffeine to protect against AD.

Presenters
UK

Umer Khan

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

437 Exploring the Role of GPRC6A in Regulating mTORC1 Signaling and Tau Metabolism
John Calahatian, Chao Ma MS, Mani Kallupurackal, Huimin Liang MS, Miles Nowicki, Emily Lopez, Daniel Lee PhD

Microtubule is often associated with a protein named tau. Tau frequently becomes hyperphosphorylated and aggregates to form pathological neurofibrillary tangles in several age-associated neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies. Clinical phenotypes of tauopathies manifest as cognitive impairment, behavior disturbances, and motor impairment. The aggregation of tau remains a central target for drug discovery, however, no disease-modifying treatments exist. Our data show a unique interaction between L-arginine metabolism and tau metabolism. The depletion of L-arginine by overexpressing the metabolizing enzyme arginase 1(Arg1) and arginine deiminase(ADI) significantly reduced tau pathology in transgenic mouse models. We speculate that these effects are associated with increased autophagy through an amino acid sensing mechanism. G protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6 member A(GPRC6A) was recently deorphanized by binding to basic L-α amino acids, such as L-arginine and L-ornithine.

Presenters
JI

John Ivan Calahatian

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

438 WITHDRAWN Withaferin A mediates clearance of alpha-synuclein via a p62-dependent mechanism
Jennifer L. Drew-Bear Quintanilla, Malathi Narayan, Geeta Iyer, Natasha Ram, Nicholas Johnson, Marai Roque Solares, Christina Veliz, George Padilla, Zahra Radpasand, Nidhi Sama, Sonal Sian, and Umesh Jinwal

Aggregation of alpha-synuclein in the brain linked to Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related diseases termed alpha-synucleinopathy. Currently, there is no cure for these diseases. Here, we aimed to investigate a novel therapeutic use of a natural compound withaferin A (WA) in clearing disease associated alpha-synuclein variants

Presenters
JL

Jennifer L. Drew-Bear Quintanilla

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

439 Studying the Changes of High Frequency, High Dose Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (GCSF) in the Immune System of Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Samuel Dang. Chuanhai Cao, PhD, Tuan Vu, MD, Phillip Pham, BS, Xiaoyang Lin, PhD

ALS is a neurological disease in which patients lose movement in their limbs that can leave them paralyzed at the end of the progression. GCSF is a molecule in the immune system that can trigger the release of stem cells in the bone marrow and help slow down the digression of neurons in the body.

Presenters
SD

Samuel Dang

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

440 Clearance mechanism of mutant myocilin following Grp94 inhibition
Grant L. Morrison, Ricardo A. Cordova, MS, Amirthaa Suntharalingam, Niat Gebru, Vincent M. Crowley, Ph.D, Brian S. J. Blagg, Ph.D, Laura J. Blair, Ph.D, John Koren III, Ph.D

Identify the clearance mechanisms of mutant myocilin following the inhibition of ER chaperone Grp94.

Presenters
GM

Grant Morrison

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

441 Determining the Prevalence of Substance Abuse in Uninsured Patients
Nicole Liciaga-Silva, Noura Ayoubi, Laurie Woodard, Kamal Patel, Abu-Sayeef Mirza

According to data collected across nine free clinics in 2016, 29% of uninsured patients were determined to be past or current smokers, 23% had a past or current history of alcohol use and 6% reported a history of drug abuse. All these figures are relatively higher than what is apparent in the general population, putting the uninsured at a high risk for developing long-term health problems. To alleviate this, physicians at free clinics should educate and assist patients willing to give up substance abuse habits that will certainly put them at a higher risk for encountering health-related adverse effects.

Presenters
NE

Nicole Enid Liciaga-Silva

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

442 Diagnosis and Management of Bone Diseases Among Free Clinics
Chris Rennie, Noura Ayoubi, Ahmed Naffi, Kamal Patel, Abu-Sayeef Mirza

During 2016, 232 patients from nine free clinics around Tampa had a history of general arthritis. Of these patients, 46.9% reported a diagnosis of osteoarthritis and 13.4% reported a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The remainder of the 232 patients had listed unspecified types of arthritis. Treatment of arthritis among these patients was most commonly NSAIDs, with an almost equal majority not being treated. On the other hand, of the patients addressed about potential osteoporosis, a mere 2.98% of them endorsed a history of a DEXA scan. This percentage depicted the low prevalence of standard osteoporosis screening among the uninsured.

Presenters
CR

Christopher Rennie

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

443 Roles of Adolescent Circadian Desynchrony and Binge Drinking on Alcohol Use Disorder Development in Adulthood
Hannah S Justin, John Faulkner, M.S., Amara Yunus, B.S., Danielle Gulick, MEd & PhD, Joshua Gamsby, PhD.

In spite of efforts made to impede underage drinking, alcohol use among minors in the United States has become a growing problem.  Defined as 4 to 5 drinks per hour by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), binge drinking has become a common avenue of alcohol consumption among modern youth. Binge drinking, while harmful to adults, may be more damaging to adolescents, because that age range is a critical period of growth and development for neural reward pathways. Increased Dopamine neurotransmission due to alcohol use during this timeframe could subsequently result in an increased dopamine response in adulthood, leading to a higher propensity for development of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs). Circadian Desynchrony (CD), the mismatch between the body's natural sleep-wake cycles and the actual sleep patterns of an individual, has been associated with increased alcohol use in both adolescent and adult mouse models. This two-phase experiment observes the relationship between CD combined with binge drinking in adolescence and the development of AUDs in adulthood.

Presenters
HJ

Hannah Justin

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

444 Deletion of NHE3 in intestinal epithelial cells causes metabolic acidosis
Alexandria Valdez, Jessica A. Dominguez Rieg (PhD), Jianxiang Xue (MS), Timo Rieg (MD)

Recenlty intestinal-specific sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) inhibitors, which are not absorbed into the systemic circulation, are being developed for the treatment of fluid overload conditions, hypertension and hyperphosphatemia, the latter in association with chronic kidney disease. The physiological role of NHE3 in the intestine was until now hard to determine, because no tissue-specific NHE3 knockout model was available. We are the first to generate and analyze such a rodent model. Our experiments are the first to show that the intestine has a dominante role for acid-base homeostasis, possibly even more important than the kidney.

Presenters
AV

Alexandria Valdez

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

445 Risk of obesity and associated chronic diseases: A Retrospective study on Body Mass Index of uninsured patients in free clinics
Samantha Alexis Cridland, Noura Ayoubi, BS, Rahul Mhaskar, MPH, PHD, Laurie Woodard, MD, Sayeef Mirza, MD

A comprehensive chart review was conducted on patients managed by free-clinics in the Tampa Bay Area during 2016 consisting of 4,804 patients, of which demographics and socioeconomic factors were both collected. Our study demonstrates uninsured patients are at high risk of obesity and that certain chronic diseases were associated with body mass index greater than 30 kg/m2. The health outcomes of these patients could be improved by implementing an educational intervention on diet and exercise in free clinics.

Presenters
SA

Samantha Alexis Cridland

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

446 Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions in the Tokay Gecko
Carlos J. Cruz, Brian A. Fabella, Daniel M. Firester, A. J. Hudspeth, M.D., Ph.D.

Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are one of the four characteristics of the auditory active process. SOAEs are believed to be an epiphenomenon of the hearing organ’s amplification feature and have been extensively studied in the tokay gecko due to their robust presence. Several theoretical studies have pointed to the gecko’s auditory organ, the basilar papilla, as the source of such SOAE’s. It is thought that spontaneous oscillations of hair bundles in the basilar papilla could generate emissions.

Presenters
CJ

Carlos J Cruz

Undergraduate student, College of Engineering


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

447 Web Server For DDI Reliability
Dekai Rohlsen, Feng Cheng Ph.D

We have created a Web Server that consists of an accumulation of 6 Databases worth of results. The purpose of this Web Server is to compare CYP enzyme results from each of the different databases and generate a reliability score (an imperical value) to determine probability of how two enzymes will interaction with one another. Enzyme mechanisms of action include inhibitor and inducer.

Presenters
avatar for Dekai Rohlsen-Neal

Dekai Rohlsen-Neal

Undergraduate student, College of Engineering
My name is Dekai Rohlsen, I am a student at the University of South Florida with a major in software engineering and a minor in biomedical engineering. I have a passion for improving and evolving current technologies in healthcare. I am currently aspiring towards my Bachelors, followed... Read More →


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

448 Automated text mining algorithm to identify drug side effects and drug-drug interactions from Yahoo Answers
Luis Franco, BCS; Delroy Fong, BCS

Our algorithm written in R was used to text mine through the Yahoo! Answers database for questions that were related to side effects of a drug. These key terms (including drugs and side effects) were extracted and were used to construct words.

Presenters
LF

Luis Franco

Undergraduate student, College of Engineering


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

449 Young Adult Women’s Relationship Status and HPV Risk Perceptions: A Barrier to HPV Vaccination?
Rumour P. Piepenbrink; Erika L. Thompson, PhD, MPH, CPH; Cheryl A. Vamos, PhD, MPH; Stacey Griner, MPH, CPH, RDH; Rachel Logan, MPH; Mika Kadono, MA; Coralia Vazquez-Otero, JD, MPH; Ellen M. Daley, PhD, MPH

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates continue to be low in the United States. Young women ages 18-26 years are eligible for catch-up vaccination but previous research shows that relationships status and percieved risk may be barriers to HPV vaccination. The purpose of this quantitative study was to assess the association between relationship status and perceived risk for HPV among young adult women.

Presenters
RP

Rumour P. Piepenbrink

Undergraduate student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

450 The Role of Baby Boxes in Lowering Infant Mortality Rate
Shahrzad Zamani, Undergraduate Student

Compare the Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) between several developed countries. Define the role of Baby Boxes as a function in lowering Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) in the U.S. Evaluate the application and accessibility of Baby Boxes in the U.S.

Presenters
SZ

Shahrzad Zamani

Undergraduate student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

451 Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Free Clinics: A Retrospective Study of Uninsured Patients in Tampa, Florida
Saagar Majethia, Sean Amirzadeh MD, Abu-Sayeef Mirza MD, MPH, Michael Jaglal MD, 
Smitha Pabbathi MD

It is estimated that IDA occurs in 2-5% of adult men and post-menopausal women in the developed world.¹ Another study revealed 18.5% of pediatric patients who presented with occult anemia in the ED were uninsured.² The Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program have historically targeted Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) in children by focusing on nutritional and supplementation, but no such program exists for the uninsured in free clinics.³ There is concern that Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is poorly managed in resource-poor locations and can lead to poor outcomes.^4 For example, 9% of patients older than 65 years with iron deficiency anemia have a gastrointestinal cancer when evaluated.^5 Free clinics are often faced with economic restraints that limit therapeutic options, diagnostic equipment, and patient’s ability to follow up. There is limited research on the prevalence of anemia, and its management in the free clinic setting. Uninsured patients with sickle cell anemia are more likely to use multiple hospitals for acute care due to lack of outpatient follow-up.^6

Presenters
SM

Saagar Majethia

Undergraduate student, College of Public Health


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

452 Treatment Options For Chronic Parvovirus Viremia In Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients In A Tertiary Care Center
R. Cruz AA, C. Duff, D. Krasnopero, S. Joychan MD, D. Lindsay MD, D. Nieves, M. Ellison, Z. Long MD, P. Sriaroon MD, J. Leiding MD, A. Asante-Korang MD, J. E. Walter MD PhD

Parvovirus viremia may occur in pediatric heart transplant patients with secondary T cell lymphopenia and history of thymectomy. While the treatment option for these patients is high dose intravenous immunoglobulin (HDIvIg), it may not be well tolerated in all patients. We present treatment outcomes in three cardiac transplant patients with parvovirus viremia.

Presenters
avatar for Rachel Cruz

Rachel Cruz

Undergraduate student, USFSP Honors College
Hello! My name is Rachel and I am an undergraduate at USFSP. I am a Biology Major with a concentration in Biomedical Sciences. I hope to apply to medical school soon and one day, be a physician and perhaps be able to donate some of my time to Doctors without Boarders. I am also very... Read More →


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

453 Identification of Methylation Biomarkers to Predict the Efficacy of Cisplatin using NCBI60 Cancer Cell Line Methylomes
Hayley Rein Undergraduate, Dr. Feng Cheng

Treatment selection is a crutial step in the fight against cancer, but interindividual variability in drug response can make this selection a difficult task. This study explored the connection between NCI60 cancer cell line methylomes and cell's response to the common cancer drug, cisplatin. Alterations in the expression of specific genes due to DNA methylation were found to dampen the efficacy of cisplatin. These biomarkers may evetually help predict the drug's cancer fighting abilities in individual patients.

Presenters
HR

Hayley Rein

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

454 Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) and Diabetes Mellitus
Samhitha Gudla, Dr. Srinivas Tipparaju, M.Pharm, Ph.D.

The Myosin Heavy Chain (MHC) is associated with common autoimmune diseases such as Diabetes Mellitus as shown through genetic mapping. When tested in an in vivo model in mice, MHC expression was found to be lower in wildtype mice and increased in knockout mice.

Presenters
SG

Samhitha Gudla

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

455 Determining Prevalence of Pulmonary Disease and Tobacco Abuse Among the Uninsured Population
Mohammad Ayoubi, Noura Ayoubi, BS, Caitlin Wolfe, MPH, Abu-Sayeef Mirza, MD, MPH, CPH

A retrospective chart review of uninsured patients seen at free clinics during 2016 revealed that 828 patients reported a history of pulmonary disease. Most patients had been diagnosed with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchitis or emphysema. Our data indicated that uninsured patients had higher rates of tobacco abuse compared to the general population. Given the known consequences of tobacco abuse, uninsured patients are at higher risk of pulmonary diseases. Educating free clinics on this issue could be used as a means of implementing more smoking cessation programs, relieving the burden of smoking-related diseases.

Presenters
MA

Mohammad Ayoubi

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

456 Management of Statin Therapy Among Uninsured Populations with Elevated ASCVD Risk Scores
Meghana Reddy BS, Adithya Mathews MD MBA, Robert Bubar BS, Rahul Mhaskar MD, Abu-Sayeef Mirza MD MPH

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is correlated with elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association guidelines make statin therapy recommendations for patients within certain populations considered at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This study measures the compliance of appropriate statin therapy among uninsured populations with elevated ASCVD risk scores and helps quantify the health disparity among uninsured populations. Patient data from 2016 was collected from nine free clinics in Tampa. The results showed significantly poor compliance rates for guideline-recommended statin therapy among patients identified as being at high risk for ASCVD.

Presenters
MR

Meghana Reddy, B.S.

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

457 Elevated Red Cell Distribution Width and Outcomes in Advanced Stage HCC at Liver Transplant
Dakota Becker- Greene, Michael Caire MD, Jacentha Buggs MD, Ambuj Kumar MD MPH, Ebonie Rogers BS, Angel Alsina MD

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has an increasing incidence and mortality rate. The current prognostic tools used to assess HCC severity pre-operatively have failed to mitigate the spread. Therefore, there is an urgent need to determine an accurate predictor of HCC prognosis.

Presenters
DB

Dakota Becker-Greene

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

458 Survival and HCC Recurrence after Liver Transplant due to NASH related HCC vs. Non-NASH related HCC
Anthony Fuentes, Julio Sokolich MD, Jacentha Buggs MD, Ebonie Rogers BS, Ambuj Kumar MD MPH, Angel Alsina MD, Victor Bowers MD

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is liver inflammation arising from obesity. With the increase of NASH in the Western world, the rate of this disease as an indication for liver transplantation continues to increase.

Presenters
AF

Anthony Fuentes

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

459 Kidney and Liver DCD Outcomes - A Five Year Review
Maryam Adesunkanmi, Jacentha Buggs MD, Jasmine Boone, Radhe Mehta, Ebonie Rogers BS, Ambuj Kumar MD MPH., Angel Alsina MD,Victor Bowers MD

The demand for organ transplantation exceeds the supply and has led to an increase in use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) solid organs for transplantation.

Presenters
MA

Maryam Adesunkanmi

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

460 Outcomes of Donor and Recipient Obesity in Kidney Transplantation
Radhe Mehta, Jacentha Buggs MD, Maryam Adesunkanmi, Jasmine Boone, Ebonie Rogers BS, Ambuj Kumar MD MPH,Victor Bowers MD

Obesity (BMI >30) is a world health epidemic projected to increase the incidence of diabetes, the leading cause of kidney failure. The shortage of transplant donors coupled with increased obesity makes this is an important matter to evaluate.

Presenters
RM

Radhe Mehta

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

461 A Two Decade Long Term Survival Report of Liver Transplantation at Tampa General Hospital: Impact of Specialized Programs
Justin George, Angel Alsina MD, Alexia Athienitis PhD, Alejandro Delgado, John Trendowski

Very few studies have examined long term outcomes of liver transplantation (LTx). This report analyzes two decades by a single center, with emphasis on survival and impact of specific programs.

Presenters
JG

Justin George

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

462 The Impact of CPR in High-Risk DCD and ECD Donors for Kidney Transplantation
Deandra Mahon, Jacentha Buggs MD, Ebonie Rogers BS, Victor Bowers MD

Many cadaveric donors receive CPR as a lifesaving method intended to return the patient to baseline function but the literature does not address the consideration of donor CPR as an additional tangible benefit to consider when selecting donors for recipients.

Presenters
DM

Deandra Mahon

Undergraduate student, Honors College


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

463 Effects of a Circadian Phase Shift on Learning Induced Arc Activation
Emily Peterson, Heather Mahoney, B.F.A., Hannah Justin, David Gonzales, Amara Yunus, Joshua Gamsby, Ph.D., Danielle Gulick, Ph.D.

The effects on learning and memory as affected by a phase shift in the circadian rhyhthm in a mouse model.

Presenters
avatar for Emily Peterson

Emily Peterson

Undergraduate student, Honors College
Undergraduate volunteer at the Byrd Institute. Neuroscience, the circadian rhythm, learning and memory, casein kinase.


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

464 Comparing the Anti-Alzheimer's Activity of Different Types of Coffee
Erica Ginsburg, Chuanhai Cao, Ph.D, Phillip Pham, B.S., Xiaoyang Lin Ph.D, Breanna Brown B.S.

Coffee and caffeine have been proven to be helpful in combatting Alzheimer's disease. However, there are different types of coffee, most commonly different roast's of coffee as well as instant coffee. This study will determine which type of coffee is most effective in decreasing the main factor in Alzheimer's disease, amyloid beta, both in the buildup and the aggregation.

Presenters
UK

Umer Khan

Undergraduate student, College of Arts and Sciences


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

465 Successful Reduction in Blood-borne Pathogens Exposure Rate
Kamal Patel, Rachel Williams, MSPH, MD

This study was conducted to show steps that could be used to reduce the number of needle sticks at the James A. Haley Veterans Affair Hospital. Several goals were implemented from a previous study and our study shows the significant decrease in the number of needle sticks.

Presenters
KT

Kamal T Patel, MD

Resident, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

466 The Impact of Physical Environment on Workplace Incivility and Physical Health
Jamie Striler, BA

With the constant drive to decrease spending, downsize, and incorporate temporary workers, organizations can become places of constant high tension leading to workplace incivility. The goal of this study was to look beyond the perceived psychological environment and examine the significance of physical surroundings at work. We tested a path model using CFA that showed adverse work conditions along with high interdependence leads to greater workplace incivility, which then leads to more employee health problems.

Presenters
JS

Jamie Striler

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

467 Effectiveness of Workplace Health & Wellness Programs
Rey Luna, BSN, RN

Workplace health and wellness programs have been shown to decrease absenteeism and presenteeism, improve morale, and decrease the cost of health premiums to employers and employees.  Effective workplace health programs can make the difference between a “surviving” workforce and “thriving” workforce.  This presentation provides a review of the effectiveness of these programs.

Presenters
RL

Reinaldo Luna, MS

Masters student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

468 Linking Work and Home Life: How Work Demands and Resources Relate to Employees’ Sleep and Romantic Relationships
Rebecca M. Brossoit, MS; Tori L. Crain, PhD; Leslie B. Hammer, PhD; Soomi Lee, PhD; MacKenna L. Perry, PhD; Todd E. Bodner, PhD; Orfeu M. Buxton, PhD

We tested the effects that work demands and resources (i.e., decision authority and schedule control) have on employees' sleep, and how employees' sleep has a later impact on their romantic relationship satisfaction and strain.

Presenters
RM

Rebecca Marie Brossoit

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

469 A Latent Profile Analysis of Benefactor and Beneficiary Organizational Citizenship Behaviors toward Individuals
Seulki Jang, M.A.; Tammy D. Allen, Ph.D.

The research identifies latent profiles of benefactor and beneficiary helping within individuals in the workplace. Then, the research examines whether theoretical individual-level antecedents significantly differentiate the profiles. Lastly, the research investigates how the identified profiles show different individual-level strain outcomes.

Presenters
SJ

Seulki Jang

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

470 Office Housework, Career Success, and Health: Does Gender Matter?
Joseph Regina, B.A.; Seulki Jang, M.A.; Tammy D. Allen, Ph.D.; Wednesday Radke

This study is the first empirical study that examines office housework. This study examined gender differences in office housework and the moderating effect of gender on the office housework-promotion relationship. Furthermore, this study explored the mediation effect of office housework on the gender-burnout relationship. This study sheds light on gender differences in office housework.

Presenters
JR

Joseph Regina

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

471 Different Health Outcomes of Discrimination in Hiring, Promoting, and Firing
Tyler Henderson, B.S.; Seulki Jang, M.A.; Kristen Salomon, Ph.D.; Tammy D. Allen, Ph.D

Our study examines the effects of job-related discrimination in hiring, promoting, and firing on markers of strain health outcomes (e.g., biological dysregulation, cardiovascular disease) by analyzing three waves of objective and self-reported data over an eight year time span.


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

472 Supervisor Telepressure and Work-Family Conflict: The Moderating Role of Meaningful Work
Shalyn C. Stevens, BA; Tori L. Crain, PhD; Allison M. Ellis, PhD

This study examines how an organization's expectations around responsiveness impact supervisors' perceptions of incoming messages from work and subsequent work-to-family conflict. This study also considers the role of meaningful work in the abovementioned relationship.

Presenters
SS

Shalyn Stevens, BA

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

473 Stress & Burnout in the Workplace
Lindsey Craig, BSN, RN

Work related stress or burnout is something many may be experiencing or have experienced in the past. Workplace stress is described as when the demands that are being placed upon a person tax or exceed available resources as appraised by the individual involved (Brock & Buckley, 2012). This can add to stress already felt from school or one’s personal life and cause a person to feel in crisis. Stress can be a factor in causing mental and physical ailments such as obesity and heart disease. It can cause dissatisfaction with one’s job and even take someone out of work.  It is important for employers and occupational health nurses to identify the signs of work stress and burnout and the causes to keep employees healthy, happy, and at work.

Presenters
LC

Lindsey Craig, BSN, RN

Masters student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

474 Effects of Noise Exposure In The Construction Industry
Jessica Muoh, RN BSN

Construction workers are considered to be one of the most at risk group of workers population for hearing loss due to the levels of noise exposure. Elimination of noise from a work site is not always possible, but several studies have shown methods to curtail workers’ exposure and also prevent debilitating effects like hearing loss. Correct and consistent use of personal protective equipment during work in addition to hearing conservation programs have shown to prevent hearing loss in construction workers.

Presenters
JM

Jessica Muoh

Masters student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

475 Long Haul Truck Drivers and Metabolic Syndrome: Implications for the Occupational Health Nurse
Suzanne Alexander, RN, BSN, Dr. Helen Conlon, ARNP, COHN-S, Dr. Candace Burns, PhD, ARNP

Metabolic Syndrome is a cluster of signs and symptoms that negatively impact cardiovascular health and metabolism. Sedentary lifestyle, overconsumption of nutrient poor foods, inadequate sleep, stress and loneliness increase the risk and prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome. The nature of long haul truck driving (LHTD) puts this worker population at increased risk. The driver incurs declining health, increased medical costs, more missed days and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. The industry faces retention issues, profit loss and increased medical costs. The community is at risk for traffic injury and fatality. The culture, worksite(s) and structural barriers to health-supportive living are endemic to the industry. Occupational health nurses should evaluate non-traditional interventions to prevent and treat this population. Interventions may include web-based education, Internet-connected wellness communities, improvements to the truck cabs, terminals, weigh stations and rest areas (the built environment) and administrative controls such as health screenings and scheduling changes.

Presenters
SE

Suzanne E Alexander

Masters student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

476 The Indirect Effect of Conflict Types on Counterproductive Work Behaviors Through Work Engagement
Laura Heron, BS, Dr. Valentina Bruk-Lee, Ph.D.

The present study examined the indirect effect of conflict on counterproductive work behaviors (CWB) through engagement. This study addresses a gap in the literature by examining three different types of conflict: relationship, task, and non-task organizational (NTO) conflict in relation to CWB.

Presenters
LH

Laura Heron, BS

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

477 Antecedents to the Stressor-Strain Relationship: The Role of Communication Climate
Jose F. Rodriguez, ABD; Valentina Bruk-Lee, Ph.D.

Understanding stress in the workplace is vital for effective management. Transactional models of stress attempt to understand how employees make appraisals and meaning. Organizational climate research has focused on how employees, through their interactions, create and ascribe meaning. Communication climate focuses on the supportive and defensive qualities of organization’s communicative norms and expectations. In this study, we connect two previously divergent areas of inquiry to better understand the conditions under which employee perceptions of conflict may be influenced. Preliminary findings suggest that supportive communication climates ameliorate stressor-strain processes while defensive communication climates exacerbate them.

Presenters
JF

Jose F Rodriguez, MS

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

478 The Health Effects of a Sedentary Desk Job
Hailey Lore RN-BSN; Helen Acree Conlon, DNP, MS, MPH, ARNP, COHN-

Sedentary jobs such as a desk jobs over long periods of time can result in negative health effects such as musculoskeletal problems, obesity, chronic pain and metabolic syndrome. There are multiple methods to increase one’s mobility throughout the work day to reduce negative health effects associated with sedentary jobs.

Presenters
HG

Hailey G Lore, RN-BSN

Masters student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

479 The Role of Access to Nature at Work in Reducing the Effects of Psychosocial Hazards
Arieana Thompson, B.S.; Valentina Bruk-Lee, PhD.

The objective of this research project is to test exposure to nature as a resource in the job demands-resource (JD-R) model. More specifically, the study aims to determine if exposure to nature in the workplace buffers the relationship between high work-related psychosocial hazards (demands) and occupational strain outcomes. Though previous literature has demonstrated that nature exposure can provide significant benefits to well-being, few studies that have investigated the buffering effects of access to nature at work (Dravigne, Waliczek, Lineberger, & Zajicek, 2008; Lottrup, Stigsdotter, Meilby, & Claudi, 2015). Further, this is the first study to examine nature exposure in the workplace through an occupational health framework (the JD-R model). The study will examine the work-related psychosocial hazards of workload and emotional demands and the strains of burnout and job dissatisfaction.

Presenters
AT

Arieana Thompson

Doctoral student, SERC: Sunshine Education Research Center


Friday February 23, 2018 8:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

8:00am

480 Substance Abuse Amongst the Food Service Industry
Tiffany Butler, BSN, RN

Substance abuse in the United States in on the rise, with a large number of the abusers in the workplace. Food Service and hospitality industry is one of the leading industries involved in substance abuse. Occupational health professionals have an opportunity to reach this population and and create safer work environments and